New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

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New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:01 pm

Formation of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.
The greatest advocate for the Formation of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps was Major General James Melville Babington, Commandant of the defence forces of New Zealand.

On the 18th September 1903, Major General Babington presented his annual Commandant’s report to the NZ Parliament, in which he makes the following statement: —
“A veterinary corps is in process of formation, and regulations regarding the same are about to be promulgated.”

The following year on the 5th October 1904, Major General Babington presented his annual Commandant’s report to the NZ Parliament, in which he makes the following statement: —
“VETERINARY CORPS. — Owing to the new regulations not yet having been approved, no advance towards the establishment of a veterinary corps has been effected. It is important that such a corps should exist, and it is hoped that its establishment may not be much longer delayed.”

On the 7th September 1905, Major General Babington presented his annual Commandant’s report to the NZ Parliament, in which he makes the following statement: —
The state of the mounted troops is: —
“The men on the whole are fairly well mounted, but the saddlery in many cases, is unserviceable. The care of horses requires attention, and the establishment of veterinary corps, it is hoped, will render an improvement.”
“Provision has been made for the establishment of a veterinary corps, and steps are being, taken to secure an officer as principal veterinary officer.”

Much to the frustration of Major General Babington, his application for the appointment of a gentleman as ‘Principal Veterinary Officer’ was not approved by Parliament.

However Babington was able to get William Plunket the then Governor of New Zealand, to approve the new regulations that pertained to the NZ Veterinary Corps, and their inclusion within the ‘NZ Defence Forces Order of Precedence of Corps in New Zealand.’
These regulations were published in the NZ Gazette and came into force on the 8th Day of February 1906.

New Zealand Gazette 8th February 1906.
Definitions.
Paragraph 1. “P.V.O.” means principal veterinary officer.

Volunteers.
Paragraph 2. (d.) The staff of a Mounted Rifle battalion shall be as follows: —
2 x veterinary officers, to be attached from Veterinary Corps.

Precedence.
Paragraph 4. The various branches of the New Zealand Defence Forces shall rank in the order named below: —
Permanent Staff.
Royal NZ Artillery.
Royal NZ Engineers.
Militia (when embodied).
Field Artillery.
Garrison Artillery.
Engineers (Submarine Mining and Field).
Mounted Rifles.
Infantry (including Cyclists).
Medical Corps.
Field Hospital and Bearer Companies.
Veterinary Corps.
Defence Cadets.
Defence Rifle Clubs.
Garrison Bands.
Battalion Bands.

New Zealand Veterinary Corps.
Paragraph 128. (1.) All veterinary officers shall be formed into a corps to be called the “New Zealand Veterinary Corps.”
(2.) Such corps shall be under the control of a principal veterinary officer with the honorary rank of lieutenant-colonel, who shall report direct to, and shall receive orders and instructions from, the Commandant.
Paragraph 129. All officers of the Veterinary Corps must be members of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, or hold equivalent credentials.
Paragraph 130. The ranks of officers in the New Zealand Veterinary Corps shall be as follows: Veterinary-surgeon lieutenant colonel, Veterinary-surgeon major, and Veterinary-surgeon captain.
Paragraph 131. All appointments and promotions shall be recommended by P.V.O. to the Commandant, who shall forward the same, with his recommendations, to the Minister for approval or otherwise.
Paragraph 132. Veterinary officers appointed to companies or units prior to the 1st January 1906, may, if they are members of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, transfer to the Veterinary Corps without loss of seniority.
Paragraph 133. Veterinary officers shall be detailed for duty in districts by P.V.O., notification of which shall be published in “General Orders.”
Paragraph 134. (1.) Veterinary officers shall report direct to P.V.O., and shall be on non-combatant rank.
(2.) Veterinary officers shall attend such parades and camps as required in the case of medical officers.
(3.) Members of Veterinary Corps shall not receive any capitation, but for purposes of qualifying for service medals shall be considered efficient.

Gorget Patches.
Paragraph 583. Veterinary Officers. — Maroon cloth, no loop; button near point.

Full Dress.
Paragraph 595. Veterinary Officers.
Full Dress.
As laid down for Army Veterinary Department in “Dress Regulations for the Army, 1904,” but substituting New Zealand pattern buttons for buttons therein described, and except the pouch ornament, waist-plate, and helmet plate, which are to be of special pattern. The initials “N.Z.” in silver to be worn below the badges of rank on the shoulder-knots.

On the 10th June 1906, New Zealands Prime Minister Richard Seddon died of a heart attack.
As Minister of Defence, Seddon was the man most responsible for rejecting the requests of General Babington’s annual defence reports. Having been Premier for 14 years, Seddon had seen many recommendations by Babington’s predecessor’s turn out to be failures, costing ridiculous amounts of money.

General Babington’s five-year contract as Commandant of the NZ Forces expired in September 1906, his last annual defence report was presented to the Legislative Council by the Minister, for Defence, the Hon. A. Pitt on the 22nd August 1906. —
“No transport or supply corps exist. The Commandant has repeatedly applied to be allowed to establish the nucleus of such a corps. Certain corps had generously volunteered to establish company and battalion corps for a pound for pound subsidy, but he was not in favour of this arrangement. It would lead to confusion. Similarly, no Veterinary corps exists — except on paper. The Commandant applied for the appointment of a gentleman as principal veterinary officer, but the application was not approved. Much benefit, he states, would result from the establishment of such a corps.”

I can only speculate that at the time of General Babington handing his last annual defence report to the Minister, for Defence, he also would have handed the Minister his application for the appointment of John Anderson Gilruth as ‘Principal Veterinary Officer’ to be approved by Parliament.

Major General James Melville Babington left New Zealand on the 22nd September 1906.

NZ Gazette, 21st September 1906: —
“The appointment has been approved of John Anderson Gilruth, M.R.C.V.S., to be principal veterinary officer of the New Zealand Volunteer Veterinary Corps, with the rank of honorary lieutenant-colonel. The commission dates from 23rd August 1906.”

John Anderson Gilruth had no previous military experience, he was gazetted a Veterinary Surgeon to the Government of New Zealand in September 1893, and in 1897 he became chief veterinarian of the Agricultural Department and government bacteriologist.
At the time of his appointment as principal veterinary officer, John Gilruth was considered New Zealands foremost horse expert. His position as chief veterinarian of the Agricultural Department and especially his influence among his highly qualified veterinary staff, would have been the main factors for his appointment as head of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

On the 1st December 1906, John Gilruth left for Sydney by the Maheno on his way to Europe on a visit in search of knowledge, spending the greater part of his six months leave of absence (taken at his own expense) at the London laboratories, and at the Pasteur Institute, Paris, studying the latest developments in bacteriology (of which he had been an enthusiastic student for several years) and veterinary science generally. John Gilruth arrived back in New Zealand on the 22nd July 1907.
(During Mr. Gilruth's absence Mr. C. J. Reakes, Assistant-Chief Veterinarian of the Agricultural Department carried out his duties.)

On the 13th September 1907, Honorary Veterinary Lieutenant- Colonel J. A. Gilruth, principal veterinary officer to the New Zealand Forces, is gazetted Veterinary Lieutenant Colonel.

Interestingly, the year 1907 is traditionally accepted as being the official formation date of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

The earliest mention of 1907 being the formation date of the NZVC that I have found so far, is contained within the “The War Effort of New Zealand” (Published in 1923), in which chapter nine is dedicated to the New Zealand Veterinary Corps. This chapter was written by the Director of NZ Veterinary Services and Remounts, Dr C. J. Reakes, in which he states the following: —

“The New Zealand Veterinary Corps was formed in 1907, but, apart from a nucleus of officers—all qualified veterinary surgeons—it possessed no establishment.”

In my own opinion, “1907” is somewhat vague without a specific day or month, and it suggests to me that no real effort was made to find an exact date that the New Zealand Veterinary Corps was first gazetted as having being accepted for service.
It seems logical to me that even though it only existed on paper, the ‘8th February 1906’ is the official formation date of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

As for the “nucleus of NZVC officers” these were appointed in 1908.
The following is the list of names that was submitted by Lieutenant Colonel Gilruth, to the Adjutant-General NZ Forces, for gazetted as Officers of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.
(Dated: 3rd April 1908)

Charles John Reakes — Lieutenant Colonel.
William Dempster Snowball — Major.
Joseph Lyons — Major.
John Greenwood Clayton — Major.
Alexander Robertson Young — Major.
Charles James Sanderson — Major.
Charles Raymond Neale — Major.
George R. Owen — Captain.
A. M. Brodie — Captain.
Harry Avery Reid — Captain.
Frederick Charles Robertson — Captain.
Donald Harry Rait — Captain.
Henry Lord Marsack — Captain.
Herbert Seton Stewart Kyle — Captain.
Thomas Gordon Lilico — Captain.
Samuel Burton — Captain.
Peter Maxwell Edgar — Captain.
John Robert Charlton — Captain.

General Orders, April 1908.
“In future all field batteries of artillery, mounted corps, etc., will be under proper veterinary supervision. Colonel J. A- Gilruth will be Director-General of the corps.”

The enrolled strength of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps on the 30th November 1908, was 11 veterinary officers. (It is probable that the low number is due to some Veterinary officers would have still been enrolled under their previous regiments)

With the nucleus of officers having been appointed, the following regulations for the Veterinary Corps were gazetted in November 1908. —
VETERINARY CORPS.
“General orders issued by the Defence Council set out that all veterinary officers shall be formed into a corps to be called the New Zealand Veterinary Corps. Veterinary officers, although belonging to the non-combatant branch, shall rank relatively with combatant officers. Officers, on joining the corps, shall be appointed to the rank of captain. All officers of the Veterinary Corps must be members of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, or hold equivalent credentials, judged to be equivalent in the estimation of the director-general. The officer commanding the New Zealand Veterinary Corps shall be designated the Director-General of Veterinary Services, and shall be charged with the administration of the veterinary services of the Dominion, the supervision of the veterinary duties of and the supply of veterinary stores to the Defence Forces. He shall recommend to the Council of Defence gentlemen for commissions in the New Zealand Veterinary Corps, and examine into the qualifications of all persons whose names are submitted to him by the principal veterinary officers. Veterinary officers shall not be appointed to corps, but principal veterinary officers of districts shall, on communication with the Officer Commanding the District, detail veterinary officers to attend mounted ramps and manoeuvres, and perform such duties as may from time to time be required. Veterinary officers, farrier sergeant-majors, and farrier-sergeants shall be deemed efficient, and shall be paid capitation allowance as laid down for mounted rifles, on a certificate signed by the Officer Commanding District, and countersigned by the Director-General of Veterinary Services, stating that the officers and non-commissioned officers have performed their duties satisfactorily during the year, and shall be allowed to count such service as "efficient" service towards earning volunteer service medals and decoration. Veterinary officers away from home on duty shall be allowed travelling allowance, as provided by regulation 385 of the general regulations — viz., Director-General of Veterinary Services, 15s per day ; and other veterinary officers, 12s per day.”

New Zealand Gazette, March 1909.
His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to approve: —
That the resignation of Colonel J. A. Gilruth, Director-General Veterinary Services, New Zealand Veterinary Corps, has been accepted, that his name be placed on the active list (unattached), with rank of Veterinary Colonel; Lieut-Colonel C. J. Reakes M.R.C.V.S., to take his place as Director-General of Veterinary Services.

Lieutenant Charles John Reakes was a very popular and capable officer, he was appointed assistant chief veterinarian of the Agricultural Department in 1901, and was principal veterinary officer for the Wellington military district prior to his appointment as Director-General of Veterinary Services.

In April 1909, the appointment of Major A. R. Young as principal veterinary officer for the Wellington military district was approved.

The enrolled strength of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps in June 1909 was 20 veterinary officers.

Dress Regulations, 28 May 1910.
The new field service uniform to be issued to the New Zealand Territorial force will be of khaki with a tinge of green, and the only mark of distinction between the various rank of battalions will be a narrow stripe of coloured piping on the shoulder straps, together with a brass regimental number, and a badge if any, and colours have been fixed as follows: —
Field garrison artillery, No. 1 mounted regiment, and No. 2 infantry battalion— scarlet.
Engineer services, No. 2 mounted regiment, and No. 2 infantry battalion— blue.
No. 3 mounted regiment and No. 3 infantry battalion— green.
No. 4 mounted regiment and No. 4 infantry battalion, and New Zealand veterinary corps— maroon.
Army service corps— white.
Medical services— dull cherry.

The enrolled strength of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps in July 1910 was 19 veterinary officers (unattached).

G.H.Q Circular 10, 2nd February 1911.
It has been decided to cancel paragraph re piping of the pamphlet Dress Regulations, and to substitute the following: —
Mounted Rifles—Green.
Artillery—Red.
Infantry—Red.
Engineers—Blue.
Army Service Corps—White.
Medical—Cherry.
Veterinary—Maroon.

G.H.Q Circular 12, 2nd February 1911.
It has been decided to cancel paragraph re Shoulder Badges of the pamphlet Dress Regulations, and to substitute the following: —
Shoulder Badges
Material—Brass
N.Z.V.C — Veterinary Corps.

Precedence of Corps in New Zealand Military Forces, March 1911.
1. Royal New Zealand Artillery.
2. Regiments of Mounted Rifles.
3. New Zealand Field Artillery.
4. New Zealand Garrison Artillery.
5. New Zealand Engineers. 6.
6. Infantry Regiments.
7. New Zealand Army Service Corps.
8. New Zealand Medical Corps.
9. New Zealand Veterinary Corps.
10. Rifle Clubs.
11. Senior Cadets.

New Zealand Military Forces
DRESS REGULATIONS
8th February 1912

Part 1. — General Instructions.
Officers of the Territorial Forces.
8. Veterinary officers will wear the uniform of the N.Z.V.C., whether on the Staff or not.

Part 4. — NZ Territorial Forces: Officers.
Full Dress.
55. It is to be distinctly understood that the provision of full dress is purely optional. The Artillery, Engineers, Army Service Corps and Medical Corps and Veterinary Corps should adopt that similar to those Imperial units, with local badges.
Blue Overall and Pantaloons. (Worn with Blue-serge tunic)
57. See para. 36, Part 1, General Instructions; with stripe according to branch of service as follows: —
Veterinary Corps. — Two ¾ inch stripes, maroon cloth, 1/8 inch apart.
Forage Caps.
58. Veterinary Corps. — Blue cap, with maroon band.
Field Service Uniform: Khaki.
61. (1.) Felt Hats with Puggaree. — Veterinary Corps—maroon puggaree.

Part 5. — NZ Territorial Forces: N.C.O.s and Men.
Service Uniform.
64. (3.) Jackets (universal for all Services).
The following distinguishing braid or piping, ¼ inch wide, will be worn on the shoulder strap: Veterinary— maroon.
(8.) Badges, shoulder, service jacket.
New Zealand Veterinary Corps — N.Z.V.C.
(11.) Hats. — Hats felt, drab colour for all services, with distinctive puggaree denoting the particular service.
Veterinary Corps—maroon puggaree.
Last edited by atillathenunns on Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:24 pm

New Zealand Veterinary Corps Officer Badges.
On the 17th March 1911, the New Zealand Military Forces were reorganised into twelve mounted regiments and sixteen infantry regiments.
It is my understanding that shortly after the announcement of these changes, Major General John Godley requested that all Commanding Officers submit designs of their Regimental or Corps crests for approval.

On the 21st June 1911, Captain H. A. Reid on behalf of the Director of Veterinary Services, submitted for the approval of the General Officer Commanding (G.O.C), “designs of badges to be worn by Officers of the Veterinary Corps on service uniform.”

The designs had been executed by Firmin & Company in London, and were identical to those worn by the Officers of the Imperial Veterinary Corps, with the exception of the letters NZVC which had been substituted for A.V.C (Army Veterinary Corps).
Firmin offered to supply the badges at a cost of 3 shillings per cap badge and 5 shillings per pair of collar badges. (Firmin also supplied an Imperial Army Veterinary Corps cap and collar badge as examples).

Example of a British Army Veterinary Corps (AVC) cap badge.
Image

The ‘General Officer Commanding’ approved the NZVC service dress badge designs on the 8th July 1911. (The only alteration made was that laurel leaf had been crossed out, and oak leaf written in)

New Zealand Veterinary Corps bronze oak leaf ‘Service Dress’ cap badge.
Image

Unfortunately, I have been unable to find out how many badges were produced at this time, but it would be most probable, given the number of NZVC officers on strength at this time, that only around 20 sets of bronze cap and collar badges would have been produced, and quite possibly a similar or lesser number in brass/gilt metal for the dress blues uniform.

New Zealand Veterinary Corps brass/gilt oak leaf ‘Dress Blues’ cap badge.
Image

On the 28th March 1913, the Director of Veterinary Services Lieut-Colonel C. J. Reakes submitted two more badge designs for approval. —

The first design was addressed to the Quartermaster General, and was submitted for the approval of the General Officer Commanding for. — “A design for a Dress Badge, to be adopted by the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.”
The New Zealand Veterinary Corps gilt and silver ‘Dress Badge’ was approved and registered by the Quartermaster Generals office on the 10th April 1913.

New Zealand Veterinary Corps gilt and silver oak leaf ‘Full Dress’ cap badge.
Image

The second design was addressed to Major General Godley and reads as follows. —
“Sir, — Further to my letter of 3rd October last, (1912) in response to your request for copies of regimental crest: I beg to submit herewith, for your approval, the enclosed design, which Captain Reid has had prepared in London. It is proposed, subject to your approval, to adopt this design as a crest for the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.
I am, Sir, yours obediently, C. J. Reakes Lt. Col. Director.”

The NZVC Regimental Crest design submitted by Colonel Reakes was the same as the previous badge designs, with the exception of the Royal cypher ‘GVR’ which had been substituted for NZVC.

On the 9th April 1913, the Quartermaster General sent Colonel Reakes the following reply. —
“Re Regimental Crest: — I am directed to enquire whether it is not considered advisable that the central cypher should be replaced by the monogram ‘N.Z.V.C.’ to obviate the necessity of altering the crest on any change of Sovereign. Design returned herewith. Please re-submit with your reply, and amended if necessary.”

The NZVC Regimental Crest was approved on the 5th May 1913.

Chapter IX. New Zealand Veterinary Corps. By Dr. C. J. Reakes
“On the outbreak of war immediate calls were made upon the resources of the Corps, for the purchase of military horses, the provision of veterinary officers for duty on transports, and in the training of essential personnel which had to be enrolled for the carrying out of routine duties. To do this it was necessary to utilise the services of all available qualified veterinary surgeons in New Zealand. The majority of those so enrolled subsequently received commissions in the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.”

Ten officers of the NZ Veterinary Corps sailed with the NZEF Main Body on the 16th October 1914.
It is recorded that some of these officers were not issued with regimental badges before they departed.

On the 1st September 1914, Colonel Reakes sent an order for 20 sets of NZVC ‘bronze’ cap and collar badges to Firmin & Sons in London.
The NZVC officer badges appear to have been completed by Firmins on the 21st October 1914, and were then forwarded to the NZ High Commissioners office in London.

The NZ High Commissioner Sir Thomas McKenzie placed the NZVC badges in the hands of Captain Francis Lampen, who had enlisted with the NZEF in the UK, and was in charge of bringing the British Section of the NZEF from the UK to Egypt in 1914.
Captain Lampen arrived in Egypt around the 24th December 1914, and would have handed the badges over to the NZEF Quatermaster.
These badges were sold to the NZVC officers for their cost price of. —
NZVC Bronze cap badge — 3 shillings.
NZVC Bronze collar badges — 5 shillings. (Per pair)

A second order for 12 sets of NZVC ‘bronze’ cap and collar badges, and 12 Gilt and Silver Dress cap badges were obtained from Firmin & Sons. These were received by the Quartermaster General in Wellington on the 18th February 1915.
The costs of the postage from England were factored into the final cost of the badges and were sold to NZVC officers at the following prices. —
NZVC Bronze cap badge — 3 shillings and sixpence.
NZVC Bronze collar badges — 5 shillings and sixpence. (Per pair)
NZVC Gilt and Silver Dress cap badge — 8 shillings and sixpence.

The active service personnel of the veterinary corps comprised the following twenty-six officers:—
MAIN BODY
Major Alexander Reid Young. N.Z.V.C. (Assistant Director of Veterinary Services)
Serial No. 15/11
Attached: Headquarters.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914, HMNZT No. 3 (Maunganui)

Captain Peter Maxwell Edgar, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 11/708
Attached: Wellington Mounted Rifle Regiment Headquarters.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914, HMNZT No. 6 (Orari)

Major James Stafford, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 7/496
Attached: Canterbury Mounted Rifle Regiment Headquarters.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914.

Captain Thomas Arnold Blake, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 13/637
Attached: Auckland Mounted Rifle Regiment Headquarters.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914.

Captain Edmund Carlisle Howard, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 9/579
Attached: Otago Mounted Rifle Regiment Headquarters.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914.

Captain George Noel Waugh, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 10/86
Attached: Infantry Brigade Headquarters.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914, HMNZT No. 5 (Ruapehu)
Accidental death (shot by sentry) on active service, 26 May 1917, France.

Captain Jacob Hope Primmer, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 2/282
Attached: Divisional Troops, Divisional Artillery.
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914.
Accidentally killed (by lightning) on active service, 12 June 1917, Belgium.

Captain Alexander Taylor, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/345
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914, HMNZT No. 11 (Athenic)

Captain Ernest Lloyd Siddall, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/ 319
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914, HMNZT No. 8 (Star of India)

Captain William George Taylor. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/269A
Embarkation Date: 16 October 1914, HMNZT No. 10 (Arawa)

NZVC REINFORCEMENTS
Captain Daniel Hay Machattie. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/250
No. 1 Veterinary Section.
Embarkation Date: 14 December 1914, 2nd Reinforcements.
Died of injuries, 20 December 1916, Egypt

Captain Charles Sidney Simpson. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/180
No. 1 Mobile Veterinary Section.
Embarkation Date: 14 December 1914, 2nd Reinforcements.

Captain Donald Harry Rait. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/226
No. 2 Veterinary Section.
Embarkation Date: 14 December 1914, 2nd Reinforcements.

William George Charles Smith. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/248
No. 2 Mobile Veterinary Section.
Embarkation Date: 14 December 1914, 2nd Reinforcements.

Major Charles Raymond Neale. N.Z.V.C.
17/294
Attached: NZ Army Service Corps.
Embarkation Date: 14 February 1915, 3rd Reinforcements.

Captain Thomas Gordon Lilico, N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/296
Embarkation Date: 17 April 1915, 4th Reinforcements.

Captain John Danskin. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. ?????
Attached: Headquarters Staff
Embarkation Date: 22 February 1916

Captain William Proudfoot Begg. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/417
Embarkation Date: 29 February 1916.

Major Harry Avery Reid. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/435
Embarkation Date: 1 April 1916, 11th Reinforcements.

Captain Alexander Adair Johnson. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 37126
Embarkation Date: 5 December 1916, 19th Reinforcements.

Captain Fred Crossley. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 53679
Embarkation Date: 19 April 1917, 24th Reinforcements.

Captain Edwin Eli Elphick. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 55197
Embarkation Date: 17 May 1917

Captain William Charles Ring. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 60379
Embarkation Date: 26 July 1917

Captain William Christopher Barry. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 66248
Mobile Veterinary Section.
Embarkation Date: 21 February 1918

Captain Richard Harold Meade. N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 81999
Embarkation Date: 9 August 1918

Lieutenant George Norman McLean N.Z.V.C.
Serial No. 17/418
Embarkation Date: 29 February 1916

Major D. Munro, Major Robinson, Captain Gomez, and Lieutenant McCallum (who were not members of the Veterinary Corps), undertook veterinary duties on early transports. Captains McHattie, Primer, and Waugh were killed in action, and Captains Lillico and Rait died after their return to New Zealand.

Gazetted January 1915.
His Excellency the Governor has approved the appointments, promotions, of the undermentioned officers of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps. —
Lieutenant - Colonel Charles John Reakes, M.R.C.V-S., Director of Veterinary Services and Remounts, to be Colonel.
The under-mentioned Majors to be Lieutenant Colonels. —
John Greenwood Clayton, M.R.C.V.S., Principal Veterinary Officer, Canterbury Military District.
William Dempster Snowball, M.R.C.V.S., V.D., Principal Veterinary Officer, Otago Military District.
Alexander Reid Young, M.R.C.V.S., Principal Veterinary Officer, Wellington Military District.
Joseph Lyons, M.R.C.V.S., Principal Veterinary Officer, Auckland Military District.

The following decorations were awarded to members of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps:—D.S.O. to Major Stafford; Croix de Guerre to Captain Blake; C.B.E. to Colonel C. J. Reakes; O.B.E. to Major Edgar; O.B.E. to Lieut.-Col. Reid.

New Zealand Veterinary Corps Officer Buttons.
Buttons worn by volunteer Veterinary officers from 1895 to 1910, were the universal NZ volunteer pattern.

The 1912 Dress Regulations for the NZ Military Forces is clearly defined in paragraph 24. —
“The New Zealand universal pattern for all branches of service except Artillery, who will wear the Artillery button authorised.”

Colonel Reakes ordered two sets of NZVC buttons from Firmin & Company in London.
Firmin’s completed the first set of NZVC buttons on the 22nd February 1915, and forwarded them to Zeitoun camp Cairo, for NZVC Expeditionary Force officers.
The second set of NZVC buttons were completed by Firmin’s on the 25th February 1915, and forwarded to Colonel Reakes, arriving at Wellington Defence stores in early April 1915.

The following is the list of buttons that were forwarded to Zeitoun camp Cairo.
80 x Gilt metal Buttons for service jackets. (large)
120 x Gilt metal Buttons for service jackets. (small)
20 x Pair bronze cap buttons.
220 x Greatcoat buttons. (large)
80 x Greatcoat buttons. (small)
40 x Dress cap buttons.
10 x Pair gilt dress cap buttons.
160 x Tunic buttons gilt. (large)
20 x Tunic buttons gilt. (small)
140 x Frock tunic buttons. (large)
60 x Frock tunic buttons. (small)
20 x Gilt mess jacket buttons.
(The exact same quantity of buttons was forwarded to Colonel Reakes.)

It appears that Colonel Reakes was unaware of the 1912 dress regulations regarding buttons, as approval for the adoption of NZVC buttons was given by the General Officer Commanding, after the buttons had arrived in New Zealand.
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:34 pm

NZVC Veterinary Sections and Remount Depot
Recruitment for the ordinary ranks of the NZVC was carried out by primarily utilising the ‘Farmers Union’ as a recruiting agency.
It appears that recruit applications for the NZVC reinforcement draft of the Expeditionary Force had to be addressed to Captain Lusk at the Farmers Union, and those wanting work at the remount depot had to be addressed to Captain Schmidt, at the Farmers Union.

The following is an advertisement submitted by the Director of Veterinary Services. —
“Blacksmiths, Farriers and Saddlers wanted.
Men of these trades are needed for Service at the Front with the N.Z. Veterinary Corps. Only men proved to be good workmen, steady, and of good character will be accepted. Those enrolled will be required to go through a course of military training before leaving New Zealand.”

The men that were accepted by the NZ Veterinary Corps went into Trentham camp with the 2nd Reinforcements shortly after the 21st October 1914, where they received their uniforms and basic military training. They appear to have moved to the Remount Depot at Upper Hutt in mid November where experts gave a series of lectures and demonstrations.

It was while they were at the Remount Depot that they were formed into two ‘Veterinary Sections’ to provide support to the infantry and artillery, and two ‘Mobile Veterinary Sections’ to provide support to the mounted brigade.

The Remount Camp at Upper Hutt was the centre of the Veterinary and Remount Department, under the general control of Major Reid, N.Z.V.C.
All horses intended for use by the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, whether bought by or on behalf of enlisting officers and men, or purchased by Government buyers, were sent first to this camp.

The position of the Remount Depot was within five minutes walk of the train station and less than half of a kilometre from the Hutt river, where the horses were taken three times a day for water.
It consisted of a large well-sheltered paddock, a field hospital with a veterinary surgeon in charge, the men sleep in tents, and a recreation room was provided for them.
The NZVC main hospital was close by at Wallaceville, (also in the Upper Hutt district) and utilised the facilities the State Laboratory that was there, which did all the veterinary dispensing for the depot, and, incidentally, for the camps also.
The detail work at the depot was carried out by civilian grooms, selected for their practical knowledge of horse management.

When a consignment of horses arrived at the depot the first care was to give them water and food and make them comfortable for the time being in the lines. Then in due course they were brought up one by one for examination and classification according to each animal's suitableness for the various classes of military work. Each is then examined thoroughly, measured, classed, and numbered, the allotted number being branded on the hoof. An exact entry was made in the record book of the number, markings, and general description, together with the date of arrival, and the name of the buyer.
Prior to this the Government buyer would send in to the Head Office a slip from his purchasing book giving the description and the markings of each horse, the name of the seller, the price paid, and the date of purchase. This system enabled all necessary particulars concerning any horse to be available at any time. After being registered and branded the horse was taken to the lines reserved for chargers, troop horses, artillery, transport or pack horses, as the case may be, tethered alongside his fellows of the same class, and commences his first experience of camp life.

Officers of the NZ Veterinary Sections: —
(No. 1 Veterinary Section) Captain Daniel Hay Machattio, (No. 2 Veterinary Section) Captain Donald Henry Rait.
Mobile Veterinary Sections: —
(No. 1 Mobile Veterinary Section) Captain Charles Sidney Simpson, (No. 2 Mobile Veterinary Section) Captain William George Charles Smith.

First appointments of N.C.O.S. of the NZ Veterinary Sections: —
“The following temporary appointments in the Second Reinforcements, now encamped at Trentham, have been made as from 1st December 1914:—
No. 1 Veterinary Section.—
Pte. W. Innes, to be sergeant; Pte. Taylor, to be sergeant; Pte. H. R. Hancock, to be lance corporal; Pte. S. Cooper, to be corporal shoeing smith; Pte. A. Maxwell, to be shoeing smith, (without rank); Pte. F. Purdy, to ba shoeing smith (without, rank); Pte. S. Shilton, to be saddler (without rank); Pte. A. J. Ross, to be corporal; Pte. D. Galbraith, to be corporal; Pte. J. Pulling, to be lance-corporal; Pte. G. Ironside, to be lance corporal; Pte. W. Ross, to be lance-corporal.
No. 2 Veterinary Section.—
Acting Corporal M. H. Bailey, to be sergeant; Pte. W. J. Lawson, to be sergeant; Pte. T. J. Duffy, to be sergeant; Pte. J. Matheson, to be corporal shoeing smith; Pte. T. Lampert, to be shoeing smith (without rank); Pte. J. S. Watts, to be shoeing smith (without rank); Pte. W. F. Morgan, to be saddler (without rank); Pte. F. Buttrick, to be corporal; Pte. W. Hartras, to be corporal; Pte. J. Gardiner, to be lance corporal; Pte. G Mitchell, to be lance corporal; Pte. W. M. Bond, to be lance corporal.
No. 1 Mobile Veterinary Section.—
Corp. F. Parker, to be sergeant; Corp. J. R. Symes, to be sergeant. Trooper J. W. Hughes, to be corporal.
No. 2 Mobile Veterinary Section.—
Trooper. F. D. Moss, to be sergeant; Trooper R. McCullock, to be corporal; Trooper W. G. Stevenson, to be corporal; Trooper A. E. Trevathan, to be corporal.”

The New Zealand Veterinary Sections embarked with the 2nd Reinforcements on the 14th December 1914, arriving in Egypt in January 1915.

New Zealand Veterinary Corps Ordinary Ranks Badges
On the 28th November 1914, a letter was sent on behalf of Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Bowler, Commanding officer of the 2nd Reinforcements, to the NZ Defence Force Headquarters stating that. —
“ Only very few of the Regiments which reinforcements are being sent forward have provided badges for their representatives.
As time is now very limited I would suggest that an official circular be sent to all regiments seeking what is being done in this connection. It is certain that many of the badges cannot be obtained in New Zealand, and in these cases regiments should be required to order badges to be supplied by the manufactures direct to the Officer Commanding Reinforcements on arrival in England.”

On the 8th December 1914, the Quartermaster Generals office sent a letter to the Commandant of Trentham Reinforcement camp stating that. —
“As these badges are entirely a Regimental matter, the department has no idea who are the makers and who hold the dies, but it is understood that when the main Expeditionary Force went forward, they arranged with the manufacturers of the various Badges to have a further supply made on their arrival in England.”

Unfortunately for the men of the NZ Veterinary Corps, nothing was done in arranging NZVC badges for the men.
It wasn’t until a member of the No. 1 Veterinary Section wrote a letter, dated 18th February 1916, to his local Member of Parliament and complained that. —
“The New Zealand Veterinary Corps are the only corps without a badge of any description.”
Image

The NZVC men in Egypt however, took matters into their own hands, and produced their own badge.
They were unofficial and manufactured by Egyptian craftsmen.

Unofficial NZVC Ordinary Ranks Cap and Collar Badges. (L. Osborne collection)
Image

Unfortunately, a couple of NZ badge books have incorrectly identified these ‘private purchase’ ‘NZVC Ordinary Rank badges’ as belonging to the 17th NZVC Reinforcement draft, due to the number ‘17’ under the crown.

The NZ Veterinary Corps unit number 17, was allocated by the Director of Base Records in connection with the allotment of regimental numbers to men on active service.
The prefix ‘17’ was used by the NZVC up until the 11th reinforcements. From the 12th reinforcements onwards, the prefix ‘17’ was omitted and a strict numerical sequence was used.

The following photographs show NZVC men wearing the unofficial first pattern badges.
(All are NZVC men who embarked with the 2nd Reinforcements)

Lance Corporal William Harold Sutton, Serial No. 17/195, 2nd Reinforcements, Veterinary Corps, Embarkation Date 14 December 1914.
Image

Trooper Harry Goddard 17/68, and Sergeant James Goddard 17/67, 2nd Reinforcements Veterinary Corps, Embarkation Date 14 December 1914.
Image

Lance Corporal Robert Carville Bett, Serial No. 17/253, 2nd Reinforcements, Veterinary Corps, Embarkation Date 14 December 1914. (Died of wounds 15 June 1917)
Image

Trooper Francis Alfred Cosgrove, Serial No. 17/41, 2nd Reinforcements, Veterinary Corps, Embarkation Date 14 December 1914. (Killed in action 15 September 1916)
Image

Official NZVC Ordinary Ranks Cap and Collar Badges.
The letter of complaint (mentioned earlier in this post) was forwarded on to the Defence Minister, who then brought it to the attention of Colonel Reakes to sort out.
The problem of securing NZVC badges eventually fell on Major H. A Reid’s shoulders, who at the time was also trying to sort out the payment to Firmins for the officers badges.
Possibly due to the unpaid Firmin bill, or maybe orders from above to sort out the problem quickly, Major Reid decided to source the badges within New Zealand.

Major Reid sent a Gilt and Silver NZVC officer’s badge as an example, and a letter requesting the price to manufacture, to the firm of ‘Moller and Young, General Engravers and Die Sinkers’ of 119 Worcester street, Christchurch.

Unfortunately, I can only speculate that Major Reid’s letter to Moller and Young, described the projected NZVC badge to have fern leaves instead of a oak leaf wreath, and it was not preferred to have the proposed badge made with silver centre.

Moller and Young sent the following prices (dated 28/3/1916) to Major Reid who received them on the 29th March 1916.
“We can supply you with badges in brass, copper or gilding metal as per designs at 3 shillings and 3 pence (die inclusive) each for a quantity of 100.
If the badge is to have a silver centre the cost will be 4 shillings and 6 pence each for a quantity of 100.”

The NZVC badge design for the N.C.Os and men differed from the officers version due to the use fern leaves, as such it required approval from the General Officer Commanding.

The following extracts are from a letter sent by Colonel Reakes (dated the 19th April 1916) to the G.O.C, Defence Headquarters, Wellington. —
“The only badges in use in the Veterinary Corps are those which officers of the corps have themselves purchased. The badge was approved by General Godley at the time it was first brought into use. I am now writing the Q.M.G in the matter of providing badges for N.C.Os and men of the corps.
As regards the N.C.Os and men of the corps now with the Expeditionary Force I should like, if approval can be obtained, to have badges supplied to them by the Department. I have a reasonable price (3/3d. each) quoted for them.
I attach copy of my memo. To the Q.M.G mentioned above.”

The following letter is the original memo sent by Colonel Reakes (dated the 18th April 1916) to the Quartermaster General.
Image

I have been unable to find an exact date of authorisation for the ordinary ranks NZVC badges, but would assume they were authorised before the end of April 1916.

Although I provided a quote for the supply of NZVC ordinary ranks badges from Moller and Young that is dated 28th March 1916, evidence suggests that they did not supply the first NZVC badges. Instead it appears that J.R.Gaunt, a well known British badge manufacturer, produced the first NZVC ordinary ranks cap, collar and shoulder title badges up until April 1917, after which the NZVC badges appear to have been produced in New Zealand.

Official NZVC Ordinary Ranks Cap and Collar Badges.
Image
It appears that Bronze versions of these badges were worn post WW1 by NZVC officers.
Last edited by atillathenunns on Wed Jun 29, 2011 5:54 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby hbtoday98 » Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:39 pm

geat stuff great
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby Steve_Butler » Fri Jul 30, 2010 9:44 am

Thanks for the great effort - without doubt this item should be listed into our "Badges" section proper so as the general public may access this material through the website proper - I will wait until finished and then take the project across to its own page.
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby pukman » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:29 pm

Heres some New Zealand Veterinary Officers from the Boer War,pictures from the weekly press (Christchurch)

Veterinary Surgeon Neill,4th Contingent

Veterinary Surgeon,Captain Snowball

Captain Hayhurst,Veterinary


Veterinary Surgeon Neill ,4th Contingent.jpg
Veterinary Surgeon ,Captain Snowball.jpg
Captain Hayhurst,Veterinary.jpg
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby pukman » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:39 pm

Veterinary Surgeon Worthy ,5th Contingent.

Veterinary Leuitenant Wilkie and his farriers on troopship.

Farrier Sergeant Matheson,5th Contingent

Veterinary Surgeon Worthy,5th Contingent.jpg
Veterinary Leuitenant Wilkie and his farriers on troopship.jpg
Farrier Sergeant Matheson ,5th Contingent_.jpg
Farrier Sergeant Matheson ,5th Contingent_.jpg (20.98 KiB) Viewed 24309 times
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Wed Aug 11, 2010 1:04 am

New Zealand Veterinary Corps Reinforcement Badges
Similar to the unofficial first pattern NZVC ordinary ranks badges; reinforcement badges were not approved or registered by the NZ Quartermaster Generals office, as such reinforcement badges were paid for by the individual soldiers themselves.
However, the NZ military authorities did condone the wearing of reinforcement badges as they promulgated an ‘esprit de corps’ among the various units of each reinforcement draft.
Reinforcement badges were usually only worn in New Zealand and aboard troop ships.

Photographic evidence produced to date, suggests members of the fifth reinforcement draft were the first to wear reinforcement badges, and that they gained popularity with each reinforcement draft.

The following listing of NZVC embarkations is included to provide some background on the number of badges that could have been worn by the NZVC during WW1.
This list includes 26 NZVC officers who have been mentioned earlier and some men who embarked twice with the NZVC. The list does not include men who transferred from other units into the NZVC.

1914—…………………………...........Embarkation Date………Strength.
Main Body………………………...........15th Oct. 1914…………...10
2nd Reinforcements………………......14th Dec. 1914………….250
3rd Reinforcements………………......14th Feb. 1915…………...27
4th Reinforcements………………......17th April 1915…………....3
5th Reinforcements………………......13th June 1915…………...14
6th Reinforcements………………......14th Aug. 1915…………...11
7th Reinforcements………………......9th Oct. 1915……………...14
8th Reinforcements………………......14th Nov. 1915…………...38
9th Reinforcements (1st draft)…….14th Jan. 1916…………....4
9th Reinforcements (2nd draft)…..12th Feb. 1916…..………..5
10th Reinforcements (1st draft)…...22nd Feb. 1916…..……….9
10th Reinforcements (2nd draft)..…29th Feb. 1916…..…….….9
11th Reinforcements……………….....1st April 1916……….......16
12th Reinforcements ……..……….....6th May 1916………….....15
13th Reinforcements………………......27th May 1916………......16
14th Reinforcements………………......26th June 1916…………...12
15th Reinforcements………………......13th July 1916……………...2
16th Reinforcements………………......19th Aug. 1916………..…..1
17th Reinforcements………………......5th Oct. 1916………..……..2
18th Reinforcements………………......5th Oct. 1916………….…...2
19th Reinforcements………………......5th Dec. 1916………….…...2
20th Reinforcements………………......5th Dec. 1916……………....1
22nd Reinforcements………………......15th Feb. 1917……………..1
24th Reinforcements………………......19th April 1917…..…....….2
28th Reinforcements…………….…......26th July 1917……….......3
32nd Reinforcements……………..…....13th Nov. 1917………..…...1
33rd Reinforcements……………….......13th Nov. 1917……..…....1
34th Reinforcements……………….......13th Nov. 1917………......1
35th Reinforcements……………….......21st Feb. 1918…..……..…2
37th Reinforcements……………….......23rd April 1918…………....1
39th Reinforcements……………….......13th June 1918………....…6
42nd Reinforcements……………….......9th Aug. 1918……….....…1
43rd Reinforcements……………..….....11th Oct. 1918……..….....2

The following picture is of Corporal Thomas Donald McConnel, Serial No. 17/339, 7th Reinforcements, NZ Veterinary Corps, Embarkation Date 9 October 1915.
Corporal McConnel appears to be wearing a ‘type 2 or 3’ basic badge frame with the letters NZVC.
Image

The following picture is of a ‘type 2’ basic badge frame, which is similar to that worn by Corporal McConnel, except instead of the letters NZVC, it has C 7/NZMR. (‘C’ Squadron, 7th Reinforcements, New Zealand Mounted Rifles)
L. Osborne collection
Image

The following picture is of Private Lionel Izod, Serial No. 17/427, 11th Reinforcements, New Zealand Veterinary Corps, Embarkation Date: 1 April 1916.
Private Izod is wearing a ‘type 3’ basic badge frame NZVC hat badge.
Image

New Zealand Veterinary Corps ‘type 9’ basic badge frame NZVC hat badge.
(The ‘type 9’ badge frame was generally worn by reinforcement drafts 9 to 16)
L. Osborne collection
Image

The following picture is of a unidentified soldier wearing NZVC shoulder badges and a ‘type 10’ basic badge frame NZVC hat badge
Image

New Zealand Veterinary Corps ‘type 10’ basic badge frame NZVC hat badge.
(The ‘type 10’ badge frame was generally worn by reinforcement drafts 10 to 14)
Image

Extracts from “The War Effort of New Zealand” (Chapter IX) New Zealand Veterinary Corps
(By Dr C. J. Reakes, Director General of New Zealand, Department of Agriculture)
In Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine.
In January, 1915, the veterinary personnel, composed of two mobile sections, and two veterinary hospital sections, arrived in Egypt from New Zealand. Each hospital could take in about 250 horses. One was for the mounted brigade, and the other for the infantry and artillery.

For a time, until Easter, 1916, New Zealand horses were scattered over Egypt, and then came the concentration for the Sinai campaign. The New Zealand Mounted Brigade became part of the Anzac Mounted Division, and the New Zealand Veterinary Corps was re-organised with fresh equipment. Major Stafford, who was now in charge of the veterinary work (Lieut.-Col. Young having proceeded to France), was attached to the New Zealand Brigade headquarters staff. As there was no veterinary hospital on the east side of the Canal, No. 2 Mobile Veterinary Section was converted into a hospital under Captain McHattie at Bir-el-Mala, where very good work was done. Every possible care was taken by New Zealand Veterinary officers to avoid the dispatch of sick or wounded horses to the British base hospital in Egypt, for when they had been merged in the mass of horses there it was usually a case of good-bye. As New Zealand's horses were mostly of exceptional quality the veterinary organisation exerted itself to retain as many as it could for the Brigade.

On the Western Front.
With the organisation of the New Zealand infantry into a division in February, 1916, the veterinary personnel took a different formation from the one originally planned. The veterinary provision for a division comprises a mobile section with veterinary sergeants to each battery of artillery, and each infantry brigade, and certain other horsed units. These sergeants, together with the mobile section and veterinary officers to the number of six, were under the command of Lieut-Col. A. R. Young for as long as he could be spared from New Zealand, and then the command passed to Lieut-Col. H. A. Reid, A.D.V.S. This officer remained in control until the troops were finally repatriated.

The mobile section acted as a collecting station for all sick and wounded horses that could not be treated satisfactorily in the unit lines. These horses were then taken to a veterinary casualty clearing station on a line of communication where they were classified. Serious cases of sickness or injury, especially those with a prospect of protracted recovery, were removed to a base hospital. There were special veterinary hospitals for certain cases, more particularly for cases of skin disease.

The veterinary personnel attached to the unit in the field had the care and treatment of all sick and injured horses. As this personnel was not large enough to meet all needs, suitable assistants were drawn from the ranks, wherever possible, to help in first aid and in the routine veterinary treatment of sick or injured horses and mules. The veterinary officer also concerned himself with the inspection of forage, the sanitation of stables, and horse lines—particularly the sick lines—and it was his duty to report any irregularities to the officer commanding the unit.

Early in the war the evacuation of horses from the mobile veterinary section in the northern districts of France was largely done by barges along canals and rivers. This method was comfortable for the horses, and generally proved very successful. When barges were not available, trains had to be used. Lieut.-Col. Reid mentions as a noteworthy fact that, despite the enormous demands on the railway systems, there was very little undue delay in the carriage of sick horses to the base. Animals which were able to march went by road if the collecting station was not too far away.

A New Zealand veterinary sub-section hospital, with Major P. M. Edgar in command, was established at Calais, attached to No. 4 General Veterinary Hospital. Major Edgar's hospital achieved a solid reputation for efficiency and up-to-dateness.

5th February 1919.
N.Z. VETERINARY CORPS, “NO BETTER WORK HAS BEEN DONE.”
Major-General J. Moore, Director of Veterinary Services, British Expeditionary Force in France, paid the following tribute to the valuable services rendered by the New Zealand Veterinary Corps in France. (Forwarded by Lieutenant-General Godley to the NZ Minister of Defence)

“Before the demobilisation of the New Zealand Division, and the New Zealand Section of No. 4 Veterinary. Hospital at Calais, I should like to express my appreciation of the excellent service rendered by the New Zealand Veterinary Corps. The record of the Division, from a veterinary point of view, all through the war has compared most favourably with other divisions. The difficulties of active service have been surmounted in a highly creditable fashion, and the manner in which officers and other ranks have stuck to their duties is beyond all praise. No better work has been done anywhere than by the small New Zealand Veterinary Hospital attached to No. 4 Veterinary Hospital, Calais. The work carried out has always been of a high standard, and it is a model of efficiency and good order. I am glad that the New Zealand Veterinary Corps has had an opportunity of being complete in all matters of veterinary organisation in the field, and that it has proved its mettle. Without question it has justly merited the good will and high regard of the Dominion to which it belongs. Thoroughly identifying itself with the Army Veterinary Service, British Expeditionary Force, the parting is one full of regrets; at the same time there remains a deep sense of gratitude for all the splendid assistance it has rendered.
(Signed) J. Moore, Major-General, Director of Veterinary Services.”

11th November 1924.
The King sanctions the New Zealand Veterinary Corps being allied to the Royal Army Veterinary Corps.

NZ Gazette, June 1926.
Amending Defence Regulations for the New Zealand Military Forces
“Appointments to commissions in the New Zealand Medical Corps, New Zealand Dental Corps, and the New Zealand Veterinary Corps, will normally be made in the rank of lieutenant, by selection and without examination, from registered practitioners who are below the age of forty years.
No officer below the rank of lieutenant-colonel, will, except under special authority from the G.O.C., be promoted until he has served for periods as set out below, has passed the qualifying examination, and, except in the cases of officers of the New Zealand Medical Corps, the New Zealand Dental Corps, and the New Zealand Veterinary Corps, has attended a course of six successive days and gained a satisfactory report: — Lieutenant, after two years efficient service as second lieutenant; captain, after three years efficient service as lieutenant; and major, after five years efficient service as captain.”

HOME DEFENCE UNITS (Training programme for 1941)
By proclamation issued 23rd December 1940, under the Defence Emergency Regulations, the following Territorial units have been called up for military training in the New Year on the dates mentioned —

The following are called out as from 3rd February 1941: —
1st Mobile Veterinary Section, New Zealand Veterinary Corps. Attached to the 1st New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade. (Auckland)
2nd Mobile Veterinary Section, New Zealand Veterinary Corps. Attached to the 2nd New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade. (Wellington)
3rd Mobile Veterinary Section, New Zealand Veterinary Corps. Attached to the 3rd New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade.

The following are called out as from 1st April 1941: —
Northern, Central, and Southern Remount Depots, New Zealand Veterinary Corps; Northern, Central, and Southern Veterinary Hospitals, New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

The following picture is of the Prime Minister Mr. Fraser inspecting the guard of honour at Wallaceville Laboratory. (Dated 18th January 1941)
The guard consisted of a squad of N.C.O. trainees from No. 2 Mobile Veterinary Corps under the command of Captain W. M. Webster (on right). Following Mr. Fraser is Mr. A. H. Cockayne, Director General of Agriculture. (Mr. E. J. Fawcett, Assistant Director of Agriculture is most likely the Gentleman who is obscured by Captain Webster)
Image

During WW2 NZVC badges were generally only worn in New Zealand.

The New Zealand Veterinary Corps was officially disbanded on the 9th January 1947.
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Wed Sep 08, 2010 6:17 pm

The following list is of all the 'Pre 1906 NZ Veterinary Officers' that I have been able to find so far.

NZ Veterinary Officers, Colonial New Zealand War 1860 – 1870
To enforce a somewhat rather dubious land deal, the British 65th Regiment and some artillery were the first to fire the opening shots on 17th March 1860.
In March 1861 a truce was negotiated and the Government agreed to an inquiry into the rights and wrongs of the Waitara land deal.
The peace would be short lived; the Government was under pressure to find room in the Auckland area for a tide of would be farmer immigrants and unsuccessful gold diggers from the Coromandel field. Most suitable land had been taken up, and families were driven to such expedients as trying to hack farms from heavily timbered Hunua, where giant trees could be as much as 11 feet in diameter. Envious eyes turned to the potentially rich fern-clad Waikato.
(The Colonial New Zealand Wars by Tim Ryan and Bill Parham)

New Zealand Gazette, 30th March 1863.
By His Excellency Sir George Grey, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in and over Her Majesty’s Colony of NZ and its dependencies, and Vice Admiral of the same.
I, the Governor of NZ, do proclaim and declare that the aforesaid ‘Act for raising a force for internal defence of the Colony’ shall come into force on and after the thirty-first day, March 1863.
Signed George Grey 13th March 1863.

Charles Augustus Calvert. M. R. C. V. S
Charles Calvert arrived in Auckland aboard RMS Cairngorm on the 6th January 1863.
A member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, (Diploma dated 1860) Charles opened a Veterinary establishment in Otahuhu, on the 9th March 1863.

In early April 1863, Charles Calvert was appointed Veterinary Surgeon to the Commissariat Transport Corps (Land Transport Corps).
Serving in the West Coast campaigns under Generals Cameron and Chute.
Charles Calvert is recorded to have done “good service in the Waikato and the Patea districts during the war.”

Calvert settled down to the practice of his profession in Wanganui until 1868 and then relocated to Auckland. During his residence there, he acted for some time as Secretary for the Auckland Racing Club, and achieved considerable success as an amateur horseman.

On the 6th June 1871, Charles Calvert was elected commanding officer of the Prince Alfred Troop Cavalry Volunteers. A month later, the election was overturned due to the troop not having enough members to warrant more than one officer.

On the 25th July 1873, Charles Calvert was gazetted Veterinary Surgeon to the Otahuhu Royal Cavalry.

In 1877 Charles moved to Ashburton, and remained there for two or three years, then relocating to Christchurch. He continued to take a keen interest in sport, and acted as assistant starter to the Canterbury Jockey Club, as well as Secretary to the Papanui Coursing Club.

At a meeting of the Council of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, held in London, in August 1885. Dr Fleming, F.R.C.S., and principal veterinary surgeon of the British army, proposed that Mr C. A. Calvert, M.R.C.V.S., of Christchurch, New Zealand, be elected an honorary associate of the Council, which was unanimously agreed to.

In 1887 Charles Calvert received an appointment in the Veterinary Department of the Queensland Government, and moved to the northern colony.

Queensland Defence Force General Orders dated 8th April 1889.
The following appointments, promotions, resignations, transfers, and other changes are announced-
Rockhampton Division -A Company, Rockhampton Charles Augustus Calvert is appointed to be a captain, and will take over command of the company.
(The Rockhampton Mounted Infantry consisted of. — A Company, Rockhampton; B Company, Mount Morgan; C Company, Queensland Scottish Volunteer Corps.)

It appears Captain Charles Augustus Calvert, was killed in September 1900, in an omnibus accident at Townsville.

Although I have been unable to corroborate the following information, it appears that Charles Calvert’s half brother, Sylvester Calvert aged 16, died from a bullet wound to the breast on the 24th July 1863, after an attack by around 20 to 25 Maori’s at his Papakura home near the Wairoa ranges.
(About one and a half kilometres distance from the 18th Royal Irish Regiments camp at the time)
Charles Calvert’s Father, Captain Augustus Bressau Calvert who had served about 34 years in the 2nd Dragoon Guards and Ayrshire Yeomanry Cavalry, on drawing his sword was able to convince his sons killers to withdraw.
Captain Augustus Bressau Calvert died in a hunting accident on the 4th July 1865, at his own residence, at Fern Hill Papakura.

Edward Brockbank Kinloch
Edward Kinloch is recorded as having joined the Auckland (No. 2) Troop on the 18th July 1863.

It is unclear whether Edward Kinloch joined the Auckland Troop as an ordinary trooper, or as Honorary Veterinary Surgeon. It is however definitely certain that he had been elected by the Auckland Troop as Honorary Veterinary Surgeon by at least March 1864.

Edward Kinloch was also appointed as Official Veterinary Surgeon to the Governor Sir George Grey in 1864.

New Zealand Gazette of the 9th August 1866:—
Colonial Defence Office, Office, Wellington, 1st August, 1866.—
His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to make the undermentioned appointments in the Royal Cavalry Volunteers, viz: — Auckland Troop: Edward Kinloch, to be honorary veterinary surgeon; date of commission, 7th July 1866.

Interestingly Richard Stowers book “New Zealand Medal to Colonials” mentions that Edward Brockbank Kinloch was a Captain in the Royal Cavalry Volunteers.
It is also mentioned his “medal claim rejected.”

Walter Pemberton Fooks M.R.C.V.S.L., M.R.V.M.A.
New Zealand Gazette of the 12th January 1869: —
A notice of the promotion of Walter Pemberton Fooks to be honorary assistant veterinary surgeon, Otahuhu Troop, Royal Cavalry Volunteers.

Edwin Valentine Luttrell
Edwin Luttrell arrived in New Zealand in 1863.
It appears that Luttrell joined the Tauranga Cavalry Volunteer Corps shortly after its formation in December 1868. It is unclear if Luttrell joined as a trooper or as an Honorary Veterinary Surgeon, however, by 1869 he was definitely Veterinary Officer to the Tauranga Cavalry.

It is recorded that during the campaign against Te Kooti, Luttrell on several occasions acted as dispatch rider at great risk to his life.
Due to the anxiety in Tauranga caused by the threatening attitude of the Natives, Luttrell was chosen to muster all the white women and children at Tauranga, and then had them conveyed on board the Steamer Tauranga which then evacuated them to Auckland.
(Mrs Harrington who was the wife of Colonel Harrington, is said to be the only white women who remained in Tauranga)

Edwin Luttrell relocated to Poverty Bay in the latter part of the year 1871, where he remained in his profession as veterinary surgeon til his death on the 6th September 1911.

Colonel Thomas Porter, a long serving NZ Officer and Commanding Officer of the NZ 7th and 9th Contingents made the following comments after Luttrell’s death. —

“I was first acquainted with the late Mr Luttrell in the Urewera and Taupo campaigns in 1869. He was then a smart young veterinary officer attached to the Tauranga Cavalry, a troop of which, together with the Opotiki Cavalry, formed part of the Transport Corps Escort. (Of which Colonel Whitmore placed Colonel Porter in command)
Mr Luttrell narrowly escaped the disaster at Opape in June 1869, when Te Kooti and his people, escaping from the Urewera country to Waikato, fell in with an escort post at Opape and the whole of the escort were killed, excepting Lieutenant Smith and Sergeant Dette, who escaped wounded. Mr Luttrell at that time was to have been one of the escort, but he undertook to carry a dispatch, which was at the tune regarded as a duty attended with much more danger. He was looked upon as a smart, and efficient officer, always ready to undertake any hazardous duty without a murmur.”

NZ Veterinary Officers, 1870 - 1899
NZ Volunteer Regulations.
Published 28th September 1874.
His Excellency the Governor has, by an Order in Council, made certain alterations in the rules and regulations respecting volunteers—
Any corps will be entitled to an Honorary-Assistant Surgeon; Cavalry corps to an Honorary Veterinary Surgeon.

Sameul Durham M.R.C.V.S
Prior to his arrival in New Zealand, Sameul Durham had worked as an Inspector for the Veterinary Department of the Privy Council office in London.
It appears that Sameul Durham joined the Timaru contingent of the South Canterbury troop (Canterbury Yeomanry Cavalry) as an ordinary trooper.
On the 30th November 1880, it was decided that the Timaru and Temuka contingents should amalgamate and form one troop.
Trooper Sameul Durham was elected Veterinary Surgeon of the amalgamated troop.

3rd January 1881.
“Before leaving Christchurch a friendly competition took place between the Christchurch and Timaru contingents, the test being the best performance of the sword exercise and pursuing practice. Christchurch was represented by Trumpet-major Clarke, and Timaru by Veterinary Surgeon S.Durham. It was decided in the Drillshed in Christchurch, Captain Slater and Drill Instructor Dundas being the judges. Mr Durham was declared the victor.”

Joseph Saundors
On the 28th March 1885 the Heretaunga Light Horse paraded in uniform (dark blue patrol jacket, trimmed with black band) for the first time. A subsequent meeting was held, and as part of general business, Joseph Saundors was elected honorary Veterinary Surgeon.

George Crosbie
New Zealand Gazette of the 26 November 1886: —
G. Crosbie is gazetted hon. veterinary surgeon of the Southland Hussars.

New Zealand Gazette of the 26 July 1888: —
The Deputy -Governor has approved of the disbandment of the Southland Hussars as from 19th July; and the under-mentioned gentlemen therefore cease to be officers in the Volunteer Force, their commissions having lapsed under the provisions of " The Defence Act, 1886 ": —
Honorary Veterinary Surgeon George Crosbie.

John Anderson Gilruth M.R.C.V.S
John Gilruth was born on 17 February 1871 at Forfarshire, Scotland.
Gilruth went to Glasgow Veterinary College in 1887.
In his first year at Glasgow he became medalist for botany and anatomy, and was second in chemistry. The following year he was medalist in physiology, in histology, and in anatomy, and was the winner of the twenty guinea prize for the highest number of marks in the first and second professional examinations. In his third year he was first in cattle pathology, and second in horse pathology, and took other prizes. In London Mr. Gilruth was medalist in his first year for examinations in all the subjects of the curriculum. He was the writer of the prize essay to the Royal Veterinary College Medical Association, and prizeman in pathology. For one year in Glasgow he acted as prosector of anatomy to the Veterinary College.
Admitted to Membership of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, London in 1892.
He practised his profession for some five years in Fifeshire, Rossshire, Glasgow, Liverpool, and London.

John Gilruth was selected in London along with Mr. Charlton, M.R.C.V.S. out of a large number of candidates by the NZ Government to help bring NZ livestock procedures into line with the rest of the world; he arrived aboard the RMS Ruahine around the 21st July 1893.

New Zealand Gazette September 1893: —
Mr. John Anderson Gilruth, M.R.C.V.S is gazetted a Veterinary Surgeon to the Government of New Zealand.

John Gilruth’s position was Veterinary Officer to the New Zealand Stock Department, reporting directly to the Secretary for Agriculture. In 1897 he became chief veterinarian of the Agricultural Department and government bacteriologist

In September 1906, John Gilruth was appointed New Zealands first ‘Principal Veterinary Officer of the New Zealand Volunteer Veterinary Corps’, with the rank of Honorary Lieutenant Colonel.

William Dempster Snowball M.R.C.V.S
William Dempster Snowball was born in Scotland in 1863. He gained his diploma at the Royal Veterinary College, London, in 1884, and for four years was assistant inspector for food for the City of Aberdeen, after which he sailed to Victoria, Australia, where he practised his profession at Ballarat till 1897.

On the 23rd November 1888, William Snowball was commissioned as Honorary Inspecting Veterinary Surgeon to the Victorian Mounted Rifles.
His resignation as Veterinary Surgeon Major, Veterinary Staff, Victorian Mounted Rifles was approved on the 10th April 1899.

At a special meeting of the Dunedin City Council held on the 9th December 1896, for the purpose of appointing an abattoir inspector. Mr W. D. Snowball of Ballarat, one of five names recommended by Sanitary Committee to City Council, was appointed inspector of the public abattoirs erected by the Dunedin City Council for the purpose of ensuring the supply of wholesome meat to the inhabitants of that city.
William Snowball held the joint positions of inspector and manager of the Dunedin City Abattoirs.

In 1898 William Snowball was appointed Veterinary Surgeon-Captain to the Otago Mounted Rifles, and gazetted on the 14th September 1899 as Honorary Veterinary Surgeon to the Otago Battalion of Mounted Rifles.

During the Anglo-Boer War, William Snowball was responsible for the final inspection of horses that were sent from Dunedin destined for South Africa, and was a member of the Selection and Equipment Committee. (William Snowball conducted preliminary riding tests for the Otago and Southland section)

William Dempster Snowball would achieve the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the NZVC and Principal Veterinary Officer of the Otago Military District.

Otago Mounted Officers, May 1901.
Veterinary Surgeon Captain Snowball is seated in the 2nd row on the far right.
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Veterinary Surgeon Captain William Snowball.
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Last edited by atillathenunns on Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Wed Sep 08, 2010 6:20 pm

South African ('Boer') War 1899 -1902
On the 28th September 1899 the Premier Mr R. J. Seddon asked Parliament to approve the offer to the Imperial Government of a contingent of mounted rifles and the raising of such a force if the offer were accepted. The proposition was overwhelmingly endorsed with only five members voting against it.

On the 6th October 1899 the Imperial authorities accepted the services of a New Zealand contingent for service in South Africa.

On the 6th October 1899 Colonel Penton Commanding Officer of the New Zealand Forces sent the following letter to the Premier Mr R. J. Seddon. —

“It will be necessary to send a Veterinary Surgeon with the troop horses going to the Transvaal. Mr Gilruth Chief Veterinary Officer (Agricultural Department) informs me that he will be able to obtain the services of one of the Veterinary Surgeons who have lately arrived in the Colony and I have discussed terms with him.
The gentleman should be given the rank of Veterinary Lieutenant so as to give him authority with the troops and an allowance of 10/. A day whilst engaged with the contingent in addition to his present pay.
I explained to Mr Gilruth that the Imperial Authorities have laid down the exact number of officers amongst which a Veterinary Surgeon is not mentioned and that on arrival in Africa he would have to take his chance of being allowed to take part in the campaign, but that at any rate the Government would supply him with a free passage back to the Colony.”

The failure of the Imperial Authorities to include a Veterinary Surgeon for service with the New Zealand Contingent was overcome by a ‘Special agreement,’ that was drawn up by the NZ Solicitor General, as follows. —

“It is to be distinctly understood that the appointment of Veterinary Surgeon to the Contingent is for the voyage only and will not necessarily continue for the whole or any part of the period the Contingent is on Active Service in South Africa.
Should you, however, on arrival in South Africa, obtain employment with the Imperial Forces, then your extra pay of 10/- per diem will immediately cease, extra pay according to arrangements you may make being drawn from the Imperial Government, but on conclusion of such Imperial Service a return passage will still be provided.
In this connection you will be allowed a period of 20 days from date of debarkation in South Africa within which to decide whether to remain and take up employment with the Imperial Forces or return to NZ. Such decision to be intimated to the officer commanding the NZ Contingent.”

The Boer ultimatum to the British expired at five o'clock on Wednesday afternoon of the 11th October 1899. Britain and her Colonial allies (New Zealand) were officially at war with the South African Republic.

It is worth mentioning that just prior to the Boer War six Veterinary Surgeons in England had been employed by the New Zealand Government as inspectors as part of the New Zealand Agricultural Department. As the Veterinary Surgeons were drawn from the Agricultural Department to accompany the transports, this left the NZ Agricultural Department short staffed.

As such, another four Veterinary Surgeons were selected in England by the Agent-General for service under the NZ Agricultural Department (Arrived in NZ in January 1900),another seven Veterinary Surgeons arrived in March 1901, and in May 1901, two more Veterinary Surgeons were selected in England by the Agent-General for service under the NZ Agricultural Department.

First New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant Charles Raymond Neale
Charles Neale would be the first New Zealand Veterinary Officer to serve outside of New Zealand on Active Service. Charles also enters the New Zealand history books as being the first New Zealand Veterinary Officer to come under fire in both the South African Boer War and the First World War.

Charles Raymond Neale was born in England on the 31st May 1872. His father (Major Charles Neale of the Scots Greys) managed estates in Scotland, with eight large farms in hand, and Charles used to assist him.

Charles graduated Veterinary Surgeon at Edinburgh University having studied meat inspection under Professor Walley in the public abattoir in Edinburgh, and the inspection of live stock at the port of Leith.

Most of Charles work had been amongst pedigree shire horses, Aberdeen cattle, and Shorthorn and Jersey cattle, pedigree Hampshire Down sheep, and Berkshire pigs. He also had considerable experience of most of the contagious diseases, especially tuberculosis, and was thoroughly conversant with the tuberculin test and the use of anthrax vaccine.

Charles had his own private practice at Henleyon-Thames before being accepted as one of the first six veterinary surgeons for the New Zealand Agricultural Department. (110 applications had been received for the 6 positions)

It appears that initially Charles was attached to the head office in Wellington and then appointed Government special inspector at the Christchurch Meat Company's Smithfield Freezing Works in Timaru.

Charles Neale had served three years with the Yeomanry Cavalry in England and had won prizes in sword competitions, which would have been a big factor for his selection as Veterinary Surgeon to the 1st Contingent.
Interestingly, his uncle, Major Raymond Neale, was the head of the Army Veterinary Department in South Africa around that time.

On the 12th October 1899 Charles was temporarily discharged of his duties at Timaru, and appointed Veterinary Surgeon to the New Zealand Contingent as of the 13th October 1899.

The First New Zealand Contingent sailed from Wellington in the SS Waiwera on the 21st October 1899.

New Zealands first War correspondent mentions that Charles Neale took a prominent part in the engagement at Arundel on the 13th December 1899, and goes on to state. —

“I have just had a short interview with Lieutenant Neale, of the New Zealand Contingent.
Lieutenant Neale states that, judging from appearances, every New Zealander remained as firm as a rock, even when the scouts were surprised by a number of Boers taking shelter in one of the kopjes, and had to stand a heavy fire, which they well returned with good effect. From the commencement tho New Zealanders have done splendid work. They have also proved themselves to be raiders, and several bullocks and a very large number of sheep have been secured. They were not the result of a looting expedition. The stock belonged to a renegade Englishman, who, after being brought up under the protection of the British flag, went over to the enemy. The New Zealanders rounded up the stock, consisting of 2500 sheep, and drove them to camp three miles away. We had had bully beef for several days before, but now we have mutton three times per day. The officers were very pleased at the successful results of the New Zealanders expedition, and laughingly said that the Maorilanders were the best boys for that work. To see the colonials driving the sheep along and yelling and shouting as though demented was very funny indeed. The boys secured several mementos of their raid on the camp, and altogether had a very happy time.”

On the 14th December 1899 Lieutenant Neale was ordered to join General Gatacre's column, but appears to have been sent to Capetown to attend to the incoming transports and was attached to the ‘Army Veterinary Department, Field Force, South Africa.”

On the 17th January 1900 Lieutenant Charles Neale sent the following letter to the Commander of the New Zealand Forces. —

“Sir, I beg to report that I remained with the NZ troops up till the 13th December, from which date in accordance with my agreement I was retained for service with the Imperial forces and am now at the Base in Capetown.
I am happy to say that the horses landed in first rate condition and have since done their work better than the Imperial troopers; in fact the horses were reported in the “English Standard” as being the best conditioned and best class horses yet disembarked in South Africa.
I am very sorry you did not see your way to attach me permanently to the force, as for veterinary attendance they have now to depend on the courtesy of Veterinary Surgeons attached to other regiments and I am afraid the horses will have scant attendance if they get badly mauled in a big action.”

Interestingly, the British sent Staff Veterinary Officer Lieutenant Douglas to look after the New Zealand Contingent horses. Lieutenant Douglas just happened to be an ex-New Zealander.

While serving under the command of Colonel Ormelie Campbell Hannay until he was killed at Paardeberg on the 18th February 1900, Charles Neale earned the Queens South Africa war medal clasps – ‘Relief of Kimberly’ and ‘Paardeberg.’

While serving with the Mounted Infantry Brigade, Charles earned the clasp ‘Dreifontein.’

While serving with the 7th Mounted Infantry Corps in General Ian Hamiltons Column, Charles earned the clasps ‘Johannesburg’ and ‘Diamond Hill.’

By the end of October 1900, Charles Neale is recorded by his own admission to have been under fire 54 times.

Charles was discharged from Imperial strength on the 16th November 1900, and returned to New Zealand where he was appointed as Government Inspector of Meat at Gisborne.

On the 6th January 1901,Charles Neale applied to the Commandant of the NZ Defence Forces for a ‘Combatant Commission’ with the Eight Contingent but was declined.

On the 31st March 1902, Mr Gilruth Chief Veterinarian sent the following letter to Major General Babington Commandant of the NZ Defence Forces. —

“Re Tenth Contingent.
I beg as requested by your memorandum of 26th., to recommend as Veterinary Officers Mr C. R. Neale, M.R.C.V.S and Mr J. A. Towers, M.R.C.V.S
It would be most suitable for Mr Towers to leave by the first ship.
As the exigencies of this Department will only permit of one of these gentlemen accompanying the Contingent throughout South Africa, I desire that Mr Tower be permitted to return to the Colony on landing the horses in South Africa.”

On the 16th April 1902, Charles Neale was appointed as Veterinary-Captain to the 10th Contingent with the date of acceptance 14th April 1902.

Veterinary-Surgeon-Captain Charles Neale embarked with the South Island Regiment of the Tenth Contingent and sailed from Lyttelton on the 19th April 1902.
(The Tenth Contingent was disbanded in New Zealand on the 23rd August 1902)

Family member Chris Neale has kindly provided the following photograph of Charles Neale. The picture shows Charles Neale wearing his 10th Contingent uniform
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Wellington, 30th March 1908
His Excellency the Governor is respectfully advised to approve of the following appointment: —
New Zealand Veterinary Corps
Charles Raymond Neale, M.R.C.V.S. England, to be Major, and with effect from 3rd April 1908.

23rd May 1908
Appointed Veterinary Surgeon-Major, Canterbury district, NZ Veterinary Corps.

New Zealand Gazette 6th March 1913: —
Major Charles Raymond Neale, M.R.C.V.S. Eng, is transferred to the Reserve of Officers. Dated 12th February, 1913.

World War One Service.
Enlisted: — 23rd December 1914 (5/294)
Reinstated to active list of officers: — 2nd January 1915
Attestation: —Trentham, 12th February 1915, Service No. 17/294 (5/294)

Embarked: —With the 3rd Reinforcements N.Z.E.F. on HMNZT 19 (Aparima) on the 13th February 1915, arriving at Suez, Egypt on the 26th March 1915.

“Major Neale, who went with the A.S.C., was the first New Zealand veterinary officer with the Gallipoli expedition. He was relieved by Major Stafford, D.S.O., who remained on the Peninsula till the evacuation. Events soon proved, however, that horses were of little use on Gallipoli, except for some work at night. The conditions were much more suitable for mules and Egyptian donkeys. Happily the animals were not much troubled by disease, but wounds from shells were plentiful and frequent, and many were killed.”
(Chapter IX. New Zealand Veterinary Corps. By Dr. C. J. Reakes)

In connection with his work on the Gallipoli peninsular, Charle Neale was mentioned in General Ian Hamilton’s (Commander Mediterranean Expeditionary Forces) despatch of 20th May 1915.

Charle Neale returned from ANZAC (Gallipoli) to Egypt (Sidi Bishr) on the 20th August 1915.

Charles joined No. 1 Company at Moascar, Egypt on 27th January 1916, and was appointed Captain-Adjutant of No. 1 Company on 30th January 1916.

Colonel Reakes, Director of Veterinary Services and Remounts sent the following letter to the NZEF Quartermaster-Generals office on the 8th June 1916.
“Major C. R. Neale, NZVC, has returned from service with the Expeditionary Force, owing to the establishment of Veterinary Officers for that Force having been reduced in number. I am recommending him twenty one days leave of absence from tomorrow.”

Owing to surplus of NZ Veterinary officers in Egypt, Charles Neale returned to NZ on the Tahiti, departing Suez on the 5th May 1916, arriving in Dunedin on the 6th June 1916.

New Zealand Gazette No. 78, 20th July 1916: —
Major Charles Raymond Neale is struck off the strength of the NZ Expeditionary Force, and absorbed into the Reserve of Officers. Dated 29th June 1916.

Second New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant Charles James Sanderson
Charles James Sanderson was one of the first six British Veterinary Surgeons that had been employed by the New Zealand Government as inspectors as part of the New Zealand Agricultural Department prior to the Boer War.

Charles Sanderson was from Southsea, a seaside resort located in Portsmouth at the southern end of Portsea Island in the county of Hampshire in England, and had practiced as a Veterinarian in Kent, Shropshire, Essex, Wiltshire, Somerset, Devon, and London.

Sanderson boarded the steamer Wakanui that left London on the 9th March 1899, and arrived in New Zealand on the 1st May 1899. Shortly after his arrival in New Zealand Sanderson was appointed as a Government Inspector for the Auckland area. (Listed as being single and 28 years of age)

In November 1899 Charles Sanderson was temporarily discharged of his duties at Auckland, and appointed Veterinary Surgeon to the Second New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Waiwera on the 20th January 1900.

It appears that Charles Sanderson landed in South Africa in late January 1900, and served with 2nd Contingent in Cape Colony being attached to Colonel Sir C. Parsons Column.

After the occupation of Bloomfontein till the battle of Diamond Hill, Sanderson was attached to Major General Huttons Brigade, also with 2nd N.Z.M.R.
During this period he was in Veterinary charge of horses of the 2/N.Z.S also of animals attached to Colonel Parson’s Column when serving with that Column.

During six weeks in March and April 1900 Sanderson acted as Commandant of Van Wyke Vlei C.C.

In July 1900 when volunteers were called for from Colonial Corps to serve in the Transvaal Constabulary, Sanderson with upwards of 50 men of the 2nd Contingent joined that Force.
Sanderson continued to serve with the S.C. till the 22nd October 1900 when he was offered and accepted a Commission in the S.A.C in which Corps he served in until August 1902.

Third New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant Henry Charles Wilkie
Henry Charles Wilkie was another of the first six British Veterinary Surgeons that had been employed by the New Zealand Government prior to the Boer War, and arrived in New Zealand on the 1st May 1899.

Henry Wilkie was from St. Ives (Hunts) and was a Fellow of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons and a Fellow of the Zoological Society, in London. His veterinary experience extended to Wolverhampton, Bodmin Cornwall and Barnet Herts.

At the time of Wilkie’s arrival in New Zealand he was 34 years of age and was unmarried. As Government veterinary surgeon Wilkie was initially attached to the head office of the Agricultural Department. When Charles Neale was despatched with the First Contingent, Wilkie took over his duties at Timaru.

Henry Wilkie was appointed Veterinary Surgeon to the Third New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Knight Templar on the 17th February 1900.

Veterinary Leuitenant Henry Charles Wilkie and his farriers on the Knight Templar.
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Fourth New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant Peter Maxwell Edgar
Peter Maxwell Edgar was one of the second batch of four Veterinary Surgeons that Departed Plymouth aboard the steamer Paparoa on the 11th November 1899, and arrived in New Zealand on the 2nd January 1900. At the time of arrival Edgar was 30 years of age and was unmarried.

Peter Edgar was educated at the Royal Veterinary College, Edinburgh, and after graduating, became assistant to Messrs Baird, at the public slaughterhouses in Edinburgh. Later he went out to South Africa as Government Veterinary Surgeon, and went through the rinderpest epidemic of 1897-98. After which, he returned to England and was engaged as assistant to a Mr Greedge, who was a well-known Dorset veterinarian of the time, with a large farm practice.

Peter Maxwell Edgar was gazetted as ‘Government veterinary surgeon and inspector of stock’ on the 18th January 1900.

Peter Edgar was appointed Veterinary Surgeon to the Fourth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Monowai on the 20th March 1900.

After arriving in Durban, Peter Edgar was ordered by Major Francis to draw rations and proceed North to Beira to minister to the horses landed there, including New Zealand and Hungarian horses. After which Edgar returned to New Zealand.

Interestingly, Edgar made an application for the Queens South Africa war medal, which was rejected on the grounds that his trip to Beira was not connected with his attachment to the Fourth New Zealand Contingent, and that Beira was considered Neutral ground.
Edgar argued the decision on the grounds that an officer had ordered him to Beira.
The decision was overturned and Edgar was awarded the Queens South Africa war medal with clasp ‘Rhodesia.’

On the 3rd April 1908 Peter Maxwell Edgar was appointed Captain in the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

During the First World War Captain Edgar NZVC was attached to the Wellington Mounted Rifle Regiment Headquarters (Serial No. 11/708) and departed with the Main Body aboard HMNZT No. 6 (Orari) on the 16th October 1914.

On the 10th February 1916 Captain Edgar transferred to take Command of No.1 NZ Veterinary Corps.
In September 1916 Edgar was sent to England.

On the 7th November 1917, Major Edgar NZVC was mentioned in Field Marshall D. Haig’s despatches. —
“For distinguishing and gallant services and devotion to duty during the period February 26th to midnight September 20-21st, 1917.”

While attached to the 4th Veterinary Hospital, Major Edgar was again mentioned in despatches (London Gazette 11th July 1919). —
“For distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty during the period 16th September 1918 to 15th March 1919.”

‘For valuable services rendered in connection with military operations in France.’ Major Edgar NZVC was awarded the ‘Order of British Empire’ (London Gazette 3rd June 1919).
(Only 60 O.B.E.s were awarded to the New Zealand Army during WW1)

Veterinary-Lieutenant Alexander Reid Young
Alexander Reid Young was the oldest of the second batch of four Veterinary Surgeons that Departed Plymouth aboard the steamer Paparoa on the 11th November 1899, and arrived in New Zealand on the 2nd January 1900. At the time of arrival Alexander Young was 38 years of age, he was married and had two children.

Alexander Young was born at Perth, Scotland, where he was educated, and studied at the Royal Veterinary College of Edinburgh. He afterwards was in practice at Fordoun and Laurencekirk, and was Veterinary Inspector there from 1886 to 1894.
Alexander Young studied bacteriology and meat inspection under Professor Sir Henry Littlejohn, and for some time fulfilled the duties of Veterinary Inspector to the Kincardinshire County Council, and local inspector for the Imperial Government, and was for over five years veterinary surgeon to the Public Health Department of Edinburgh.

Alexander Young was gazetted as ‘Government veterinary surgeon and inspector of stock’ on the 18th January 1900 (Veterinarian for Taranaki district)

On the 24th March 1900 Alexander Young was appointed Veterinary-Surgeon Lieutenant to the Fourth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Gymeric on the 31st March 1900.

The following extract is taken from the ‘Gymeric Times’ which was printed and published on board H.M. Troopship Gymeric during the voyage from New Zealand to South Africa. (April 1900)

“Veterinary Surgeon Lieut Young is about the busiest man on board, he having a very large family to attend to. All the horses on board - over 400 - are in his charge and they require a lot of attention. He is to be seen at all hours of the day & night, regardless of the weather, running up and down the decks and holds attending to his multifarious duties. And notwithstanding his constant attention, the mortality amongst the horses has been heavy, 16 having already been consigned to the deep. This, however, is not surprising in view of the fact that many of the poor creatures have been suffering from pneumonia etc., as a consequence of the treatment they were subjected to before being shipped, and more particularly at Port Chalmers, where they were kept in the rain for about 24 hours, without food or cover, in most cases, the vessel not being ready to receive them at the hour appointed. Eight were thrown overboard in succession on one occasion - on the 5th day out after very severe weather, pneumonia being the primary cause of death.”

Lieutenant Young served with flying columns on active service, returning to New Zealand on the 1st March 1901. For his service Lieutenant Young was awarded the Queens South Africa war medal with clasps ‘Cape Colony’ ‘Transvaal’ and ‘Rhodesia.’

On the 6th January 1902 Alexander Young was appointed Veterinary-Surgeon Captain to the Eighth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Cornwall on the 8th February 1902.
Captain Young returned to New Zealand on the 2nd August 1902.
For his service with the 8th Contingent Captain Young received the clasp ‘South Africa 1901 – 1902.’

On the 13th September 1902, Alexander Young was placed on the strength of the NZ Militia retaining his rank as Veterinary-Surgeon Captain.

On the 3rd April 1908 Alexander Reid Young was appointed Major in the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

On the 8th March 1909 Alexander Reid Young was appointed Principal Veterinary Officer for the Wellington Military District.

On the 27th August 1914, Major Alexander Reid Young was appointed as ‘Assistant Director of Veterinary Services’ to the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (Attached to the NZEF Headquarters).

Date of attestation- 16th October 1914
Date of Embarkation- 16th October 1914, HMNZT No. 3 (Maunganui)
Serial No. 15/11

Major Young was gazetted Lieutenant-Colonel in January 1915.

Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander Young returned to NewZealand on the 6th August 1916.

Fifth New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant Edward Teesdale Bramston Worthy
Edward Teesdale Bramston Worthy was the first Veterinary Surgeon who was trained in New Zealand to embark with the NZ Contingents.

Edward Worthy graduated from the School of Agriculture at Lincoln, (Known as Lincoln College, and was a branch of Canterbury College) where he was granted his final certificate in 1895 having passed with great credit.

The 1895 Lincoln College’s annual certificates given to those standing highest in the different subjects of instruction were gained by Edward Worthy and G. H. Stewart. Worthy being equal with Stewart in agriculture, and first in practical chemistry, practical botany, book-keeping, farm books, and veterinary science; Stewart being first in theoretical chemistry, theoretical botany, entomology, applied mechanics, and land surveying and levelling.

After graduating Lincoln College, Edward Worthy was assistant to Mr J. R. Charlton, M.R.C.V.S who was a lecturer on veterinary science at the Lincoln School of Agriculture.

In April 1896 Edward Worthy decided to practice his profession as a veterinary surgeon in Hawera. Initially he operated out of Jury’s Stables, but by the end of August 1896 he had shifted his place of business to Victoria Street. In December 1896 he relocated to a shop at the corner of High and Victoria Street, and in May 1898 he relocated his practice to Nelson Street.

In February 1900 Edward Worthy, veterinary surgeon, of Hawera, received an offer from the New Zealand Government to take charge of a shipment of horses from the South Island for the Cape.

Edward Worthy was appointed Veterinary-Surgeon Lieutenant to the Fifth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Maori on the 31st March 1900.

As Lieutenant Worthy’s service was ‘transport only’ his medal claim was rejected.

Veterinary-Lieutenant Edward Teesdale Bramston Worthy
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Veterinary-Lieutenant Thomas Gordon Lilico
Thomas Gordon Lilico was born in Northumberland, England, in 1868. His early education was received at Belfast, Ireland, and he afterwards studied at the New Veterinary College, Edinburgh, where he took his diploma in 1888. On graduating, he commenced to practice his profession at Berwick-on-Tweed.

In 1890 Thomas Lilico left England for America, where, after conducting private practice in several centres, he was appointed Inspector for the Massachusetts Board of Cattle Commissioners. He retained this post till 1899.

Thomas Lilico was unable to withstand the intense cold of the American winter (he mentions the temperature had fallen as low as 48deg below zero) and appears to have arrived in New Zealand around April 1899, where he took over the Christchurch veterinary practice of Mr J. R. Charlton.

In July 1899, Thomas Lilico was appointed honorary veterinary surgeon to the Christchurch City Guards in place of Mr J. R. Charlton, who had resigned.

Thomas Lilico was appointed Veterinary-Surgeon Lieutenant to the Fifth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Waimate on the 31st March 1900.

Interestingly, Thomas Lilico spent 10 days ashore at Beira to minister to the horses that had landed there, the interesting part is that Thomas Lilico’s claim for the Queens South Africa war medal was rejected after the award of the same medal had been made to Peter Edgar who had almost identical service.

On the 1st March 1901, Thomas Gordon Lilico was gazetted as being appointed as temporary veterinary surgeon to the Government. In May 1901, as successor to Mr. D. H. Rout, Thomas Lilico was appointed as Government Veterinary Surgeon for South Canterbury, based in Timaru.

On the 5th February 1904, Thomas Gordon Lilico was commissioned as Veterinary Surgeon Captain to the 1st Battalion South Canterbury Mounted Rifle Volunteers.

On the 3rd April 1908 Thomas Gordon Lilico was appointed Captain in the New Zealand Veterinary Corps.

Captain Lilico (Serial No. 17/296) embarked with the 4th Reinforcements on the 17th April 1915.

Captain Lilico was transferred from the NZEF as from the 18th April 1916, due to being unfit for active service, and returned to New Zealand. (Medical report state varicose veins)

Sixth New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant John Fraser McEachran
John Fraser McEachran was another of the second batch of four Veterinary Surgeons that arrived in New Zealand on the 2nd January 1900. At the time of arrival John McEachran was 24 years of age and unmarried.

John McEachran graduated with honours at the Glasgow Veterinary College in 1897. He had had considerable experience in farm work, in the Kintyre district, and had made a special study of the methods adopted by the Governments of France, Germany, Denmark and the colonies for the treatment and eradication of diseases in live stock.

John McEachran was appointed Veterinary-Surgeon Lieutenant to the Sixth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Cornwall on the 30th January 1901.

John Fraser McEachran worked as a Government Veterinary Inspector in New South Wales 1902-07 and for the City of Adelaide 1907-09 before taking a position with the South Australian government.

Seventh New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Lieutenant Duncan Fraser
The Seventh Contingent was the only contingent that did not take any horses with it to South Africa, as such there was no provision made for a Veterinary Surgeon to accompany the Seventh Contingent.

Duncan Fraser was originally from Bulls and practised his profession as a veterinary surgeon in Palmerston. Prior to his enlistment for South Africa, Fraser had served three years as a trooper with the Rangitikei Cavalry.

On being accepted for service with the Third Rough Riders Contingent, Duncan Fraser departed Palmerston with the Wanganui troopers on the 10th February 1900.
(Fraser’s troop horse ‘Kawana’ was a well-known racehorse of the time)

Private Duncan Fraser (Regimental No: 729) was attested to the Third Contingent at Wellington on the 12th February 1900. (Fraser’s age was 28 years & 7 months)
Private Fraser was assigned to No. 2 Company (North Island) under the command of Captain Chaytor.
(No. 2 Company was redesignated No. 6 Company in South Africa)

The day previous to embarkation from Lyttelton, Private Fraser received a wire at Addington camp to report to the Transport S.S. Knight Templar.

Aboard the Knight Templar Private Fraser was detailed to act as ‘Veterinary Dispenser’ and ‘Veterinary Assistant’ to Veterinary Surgeon Lieutenant Wilkie, a position that placed Private Fraser in charge of the farrier Sergeants and Farriers on the voyage to South Africa.

The Knight Templar sailed from Lyttelton on the 17th February 1900.

Veterinary Leuitenant Henry Charles Wilkie and his farriers on the Knight Templar. Unfortunately Private Fraser is not identified but is likely to be in this photo, I’m thinking possibly the chap in the centre top row.
Image

On the 16th April 1900 at Kroonstad O.F.S. in South Africa, Private Fraser was placed in charge of the sick and unfit horses and remained in charge until the 20th May 1900.

Private Fraser’s own account is that he acted as Veterinary Surgeon to the Contingent until the time of his accident on the 20th June 1900, when he dislocated his right shoulder at Rhenoster River.

Fraser was sent to Hospital at Bloemfontein, then East London, from there invalided back to New Zealand arriving on the S.S. Wakanui at Wellington on the 9th October 1900.

Duncan Fraser was enrolled as a Private and never promoted as the establishment of Farriers and Farrier Sergeants in the Third Contingent had been selected before Fraser was positioned as ‘Veterinary Assistant’ to Lieutenant Wilkie.

On the return of Veterinary-Lieutenant Henry Wilkie to NZ, Wilkie recommend that. —
“Fraser’s services whilst with the Contingent should be recognised. The responsibility and work preformed may be considered as quite equal to that of Farrier Sergeant.”

Lieutenant Wilkie’s recommendation was sent to Lieutenant Colonel Jowsey, Commanding Officer of the Third Contingent, who supported Wilkie’s recommendation, forwarding the recommendation to the Commandant of the NZ Forces.

Private Duncan Fraser’s back pay as Farrier Sergeant was approved on the 31st January 1902 by the Commandant of the NZ Forces and backdated to the 17th February 1900.

Having been invalided back to NZ, Private Duncan Fraser was granted 3 months sick leave as from 9th October 1900, and was discharged having completed his service on the 8th January 1901.

On the 3rd April 1900 Duncan Fraser was attested at Wellington as Farrier-Sergeant to the Seventh Contingent. Attached to the Regimental Staff, Farrier-Sergeant Fraser sailed from Wellington on the Gulf of Taranto on the 6th April 1901.

The Seventh Contingent arrived at Durban on the 10th May 1901, and was immediately entrained for the remount depot at Mooi River.
At the Mooi River remount depot, the Seventh was supplied with horses and equipment. The horses were principally Hungarian remounts, and were considered “much inferior to the New Zealand horses brought out by former contingents.”

On the 15th May 1901 the Seventh Contingent entrained for Standerton arriving on the morning of the 17th May.

It would seem that the condition of the horses supplied to the Seventh Contingent was of great concern to the Commanding Officer, and having a Veterinary Surgeon attached to the contingent would be of great value.

Farrier-Sergeant Duncan Fraser was promoted Veterinary Lieutenant on the 18th May 1901.

It is recorded that after “a fortnight's hard work on column (The 7th was attached to Colonel Grey’s column) has had the result of rendering about a hundred of them (Hungarian remounts) unfit for further work for some time.”

The Seventh Contingent disbanded in New Zealand on the 30th June 1902.
Lieutenant Fraser returned to New Zealand on the 10th July 1902, and was granted sick leave from 11th July to the 10th September 1902.

Lieutenant Fraser was awarded: —
Queens South Africa war medal with clasps ‘Cape Colony,’ ‘Orange Free State’ and ‘Transvaal.’
Kings South Africa war medal with clasps ‘South Africa 1901’ and ‘South Africa 1902.’
(Fraser’s medals were destroyed by fire in 1910)

Gazetted 12th October 1911.
Lieutenant Fraser transferred from the Reserve of Officers to the Retired List as from 20th September 1911.

Eighth New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Captain John Greenwood Clayton
John Greenwood Clayton was another of the first six British Veterinary Surgeons that had been employed by the New Zealand Government prior to the Boer War, and arrived in New Zealand around the 1st May 1899.

John Greenwood Clayton was from the village of Sampford Peverell, in Devon, at the time of his arrival in NZ he was thirty-one, unmarried, and had altogether nearly seventeen years experience.

John Clayton graduated with honours at the Royal Veterinary College, Edinburgh, obtaining several silver medals and prizes in veterinary competitions during his course of study. After a four years pupilship in a large mixed practice in the Cheshire dairy district, Clayton for six years had entire management of a huge mixed practice in Nottinghamshire, in the centre of the Shire horse and sheep district, and was for the same period one of the four county inspectors under the Contagious Diseases (animals) Act, and inspector of markets (live and dead) and fairs.

After Clayton’s appointment as NZ Government veterinary surgeon and inspector, Clayton was positioned as inspector of the Gear Meat Company and the Wellington Meat Export Company factories.

John Clayton was appointed Veterinary Surgeon Captain to the Eighth New Zealand Contingent on the 15th January 1902, departing with them on the Surrey on the 1st February 1902.

For operations in the Tranvaal, over the period of April to 31st May 1902, Captain Clayton received the Queens South Africa war medal with clasps ‘South Africa 1901 – 1902’ and ‘Transvaal.’ (Clayton received these on the 6th January 1904)
On the 23rd August 1906, Clayton received the clasp ‘Cape Colony.’

Captain Clayton arrived in Wellington aboard the Britannic on the 2nd August 1902, after which he was placed on the strength of the NZ Militia retaining his rank as Veterinary-Surgeon Captain.

John Clayton was appointed Principal Veterinary Officer of the Canterbury Military District with the rank Major on the 2nd April 1908.

Promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel (P.V.O Canterbury Military District) on the 1st December 1914. (Gazetted on the 7th January 1915)

Lieutenant Colonel Clayton died on the 23rd January 1916. (Captain Herbert Kyle took over the duties of P.V.O., Canterbury Military District as of 24th January 1916)

Veterinary-Captain Alexander Reid Young
Veterinary-Surgeon-Captain Alexander Young (4th Contingent) embarked with the Eighth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Cornwall on the 8th February 1902.

Ninth New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Captain James Brand
James Brand was one of two Veterinary Surgeons that were selected in England in May 1901, by the Agent-General for service under the NZ Agricultural Department.

James Brand had experience in England, Scotland, India and Africa.
During Brand’s service in Africa, he was for fifteen months with General French in the Transvaal, and accompanied the General on his march to Kimberley, and subsequently to Pretoria.
Prior to his employment by the NZ Government, Brand was employed in the Army Remount Department, Woolwich.

James Brand arrived aboard the Papanui in Wellington on the 18th June 1901, he was thirty-five, married, with two children.
Initially Brand was stationed in the Wanganui district but shortly afterwards he was sent to the Masterton district.

In February 1902 James Brand was appointed Veterinary Surgeon Captain to the Ninth Contingent.
Captain Brand joined the South Island Battalion of the Ninth Contingent in Dunedin on the 6th March 1902, where he was placed on the Battalion Staff.

Captain James Brand embarked with the Ninth Contingent aboard the Kent on the 12th March 1902.

The troopships Kent and Devon each loaded around 570 horses. The Kent arrived in Durban on the 12th April 1902, where Captain Brand received the following accolade. —

“Thanks to the devoted attention and veterinary knowledge of Captain Brand (the veterinary officer) and his farrier-major and assistants, we have lost only six horses from Dunedin to Durban out of 562.”

Veterinary-Lieutenant Frank Carle Matthews
Frank Carle Matthews was Veterinary Surgeon to the Stock Department in Wellington.

In February 1902 Frank Matthews was appointed Veterinary Surgeon Lieutenant to the Ninth Contingent.
Lieutenant Matthews joined the North Island Battalion of the Ninth Contingent in Auckland on the 27th February 1902, where he was placed on the Battalion Staff.

Lieutenant Matthews made the selection (subject to the approval of the officer commanding) of the Ninths North Island Battalion’s Farriers and Farrier-Sergeants.

Lieutenant Matthews embarked with the Ninth Contingent aboard the Devon on the 19th March 1902.

Veterinary-Lieutenant William Thorley Franks
William Thorley Franks was appointed Veterinary Lieutenant to the Ninth New Zealand Contingent, departing with them on the Devon on the 19th March 1902.

It is worth mentioning that the Devon was only partially loaded, for a large space had to be reserved for horses and men, and during this particular voyage was considered “light and top heavy.”
The Devon as such was prone to rolling and unfortunately encountered a terrific cyclone with very heavy swells that caused a number of injuries among the horses. —

“The two veterinary lieutenants — Matthews and Franks— have been working like Trojans to save the horses, but they have in many cases toiled in vain — we have dropped them into the cruel waves.”

Tenth New Zealand Contingent
Veterinary-Captain John Alexander Robinson Towers
John Alexander Robinson Towers was one of the seven Veterinary Surgeons that were selected by Mr. Gilruth in Great Britain for service under the NZ Agricultural Department.

John Towers arrived in Wellington aboard the Wakanui on the 26th March 1901, and was appointed to inspect meat at the Wellington Meat Export Company's works in Ngahauranga.

Veterinary-Surgeon-Captain John Alexander Robinson Towers embarked with the North Island Regiment of the Tenth Contingent and sailed from Lyttelton on the Drayton Grange on the 14th April 1902.

Captain Towers was instructed to return to New Zealand and that Captain Neale was to continue with the Tenth Contingent.

Veterinary-Captain Charles Raymond Neale
Veterinary-Surgeon-Captain Charles Neale (1st Contingent) embarked with the South Island Regiment of the Tenth Contingent and sailed from Lyttelton on the Norfolk on the 19th April 1902.
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atillathenunns
 
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:06 am

Almost finished 8O
Just the badges that were worn by NZ Volunteer Veterinary Offices to go. :D
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atillathenunns
 
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby Tinto » Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:04 pm

Hi Brent, and others,
This is my first post on this Forum and I am most impressed with the amount of careful research that has gone into the various topics.
Well done!
Tinto
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Re: New Zealand Veterinary Corps Badges and Early History.

Postby atillathenunns » Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:15 pm

Cheers Tinto :D
Glad you enjoyed my ramblings.
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