SADDLERS SECRETS

The Empire Troop Horse Ordance Supplies, by Donna Nobilo

Re: SADDLERS SECRETS

Postby sundown » Sat Mar 08, 2008 9:13 am

Sorry about that! Didnt mean to translocate H.G.R. to Australia. Been flat out getting material ready for the NAMR Display at the Dargaville Museum next month as well as making gear for the Auckland Arms Fair in April also - as well as working eight hours a day and running a home! Hope I can be allowed the odd mistake? Thanks for bringing it to attention. I have a list of over 400 leather manufacturers in the Birmingham/Walsall district alone, not including all the other related trades.
Cheers
Donna
User avatar
sundown
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 8:57 pm
Location: Northland

Re: LORINERY

Postby sundown » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:59 am

spurs.jpg
Mounted Rifles Spurs. One has had the rowel replaced with a 1915 Egyptian coin.
spurs.jpg (15.61 KiB) Viewed 5518 times
pelham.jpg
Light pelham as used by Officers
pelham.jpg (15.43 KiB) Viewed 5518 times
Lorinery, the making of Bits, Spurs and Stirrups.
Most 19th Century Armies employed a Pelham type of bit - that is one with a single mouth piece and two pairs of reins. Nolan (creator of the UP Saddle) produced a bridle prior to the Crimea which featured a headcollar doubling as a noseband and double reins using a curb bit and bradoon. The Spanish devoted much time and resources to constructing mouth pieces, cheeks and curb chains in accordance with the conformation of the horses' head, neck and mouth.

The British, however, came up with probably the best solution in the Universal Pelham. Now known as the Universal Pattern Reversible or Elbow Bit. The angled cheek of this bit with a top ring meant the bit could be used on light mouthed horses with the rein in the top ring as a mullen mouth snaffle. Or by using the slots in the cheeks for harder mouthed horses. Meanwhile maintaining uniformity of appearance in the Regiments with the added advantage of a single mouth piece whereby horses could be watered in an emergency without removing the bridle. Some bits were issued twisted on one side so by reversing the bit the serrated side of the mouthpiece could be bought into contact against the tongue. The angle of the cheeks now increased to provide more leverage and thus more action on the poll of the head and against the chin groove via the curb chain.

The advantage of a long cheek Pelham meant any horse suitably trained could be put into shafts at a moments notice, the Pelham now acting as a driving bit. However these bits were cumbersome and regarded as severe by some troopers, especially those who had taken their own horses with them to the War. There are several accounts of men writing home requesting relatives send out loose jointed snaffle bits which their horses were more accustomed to. Officers used the lighter jointed or loose ring Pelham on their much lighter bridles, although I have a 1918 photo of an Officer's bridle sporting a Dutch Gag, much used in today's "modern" showjumping.

Universal Pelhams surviving today are found in Solid Nickel and cast steel, both dated and broard arrow marked.

Makers of lorinery became known as Lorimer - a surname which exists today. Other surnames surviving from the Saddlery industry are:
Spurrier - spur maker
Buckler - buckle maker
Tanner - tans animal hides
Sellers - maker of saddles
Sadler/Saddler - saddle maker
Butler - maker or seller of leather bottles
Barke - a tanner (oak bark)
Badger - maker of bags
Burrell - harnessmaker

bits.jpg
Cast steel (left) and Solid Nickel UP with twisted one side mouth
bits.jpg (16.46 KiB) Viewed 5518 times
User avatar
sundown
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 8:57 pm
Location: Northland

1890 Mk III UP Saddle

Postby sundown » Fri May 02, 2008 1:04 pm

1890 mk 3 3.jpg
Front Detail with double squares
1890 mk 3 3.jpg (21.46 KiB) Viewed 5482 times
1890 mk3 1.jpg
1890 MK III Universal Pattern Saddle
1890 mk3 1.jpg (22.01 KiB) Viewed 5482 times
At first glance this saddle looks pretty much like a 1902 Universal Pattern - but look again - this forerunner to the 1902 is somewhat different.

Introduced in 1898, the 1890 Mk III has shorter boards than the 1890 which had boards over twenty four inches long! The front steel arch extension which the 1890 UP previously had for extra stability, has been cut off flush with the bottom edge of the board. A backward step in construction using flat steel instead of angle for the arches meant a brace had to be included on the back of the rear arch. These boards were not used with felt numnahs but had "rough out" leather caps to prevent the saddle slipping.

Double squares are fixed to front of boards, where later saddles had single brass 'D's. Also two rollers are used in the spoon on the rear of the saddle. Brackets for stirrup leathers are hanging rather than fixed.

The webbing holding the seat is of similar construction method to the Luggage Saddle but was laced fore and aft rather than buckled. The 1890 Mk III is the first UP Saddle we see which has the new "V" attatchments for the girth.

Some of these 1890 Mk III saddles were made by Studebaker in Detroit but this one has no visible makers marks apart from a 'L' on the front arch.

1890 mk 3 2.jpg
Rear Brace Detail
1890 mk 3 2.jpg (20.94 KiB) Viewed 5481 times
User avatar
sundown
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 8:57 pm
Location: Northland

1890 Mk III UP Saddle

Postby sundown » Fri May 02, 2008 1:08 pm

1890 mk 3 4.jpg
Rear Spoon with double rollers
1890 mk 3 4.jpg (20.11 KiB) Viewed 5479 times
User avatar
sundown
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 8:57 pm
Location: Northland

End of an Era

Postby sundown » Wed Aug 06, 2008 1:01 pm

It was a sad moment in New Zealand's history last month as the last Tannery which dealt in vegetable tanned leather closed its doors. Astley Leather operated from the same site in Portage Road, New Lynn, Auckland from 1888. The site, near the Whau Creek was chosen by Elijah Astley, who emigrated from England, as the perfect site for a Tannery. The Company was called E Astley and Son and flourished in 1914 when the demand for leather by the New Zealand Government for Military equipment was high. The Company remained in family ownership until 1984 when it merged with leather merchants in Christchurch and became Mair Astley. In the mid 1990's the Company's chrome tanning technology and equipment were transferred to China after a joint venture with the Shanghai Leather Company. The remaining Astley Leather Ltd, which dealt soley with vegetable tanning was sold to a consortium which exported 90% of the leather it produced for crafts, saddlery and belts. The high New Zealand dollar and cheap Asian imports lead to a decision to close the factory with the loss of 40 staff.
The closure of the Tannery will have a huge impact on Saddlery's and craft people in New Zealand. Vegetable tanned leather is used by Western Saddle makers, Gun Holsters, belts and knife sheath makers, in fact any leather article needing tooling or carving can only be made from vegetable tanned leather. Unfortunately these craftspeople will now have to import their leather from overseas, driving up the cost of an already expensive raw material.
The ETHOS range is almost 100% made from vegetanned leather from the Astley Tannery. Therefore the cost of these items will also have to rise in the future.
User avatar
sundown
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 8:57 pm
Location: Northland

Previous

Return to ETHOS

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron